Study Finds Climate Change Increases Risk of Plant Invasion in Eastern United States

AMHERST, Mass.—If present climate trends continue, three invasive plant species—kudzu, privet and cogongrass—are likely to continue their destructive march north, according to new computer modeling results predicting that climate change will greatly expand the range of all three species.

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British Girls with Body Misperceptions More Likely To Experience Symptoms of Bulimia than American Peers, Amherst College Researcher Finds

January 21, 2008           

AMHERST, Mass. – Both American and British girls develop a host of unhealthy misperceptions about their bodies as early as their adolescent years, but young women from England who believe their figures are not ideal are more likely to experience symptoms of bulimia, new research by Amherst College psychology professor Catherine Sanderson and collaborators from the London School of Economics (including Amherst Class of 2000 graduate Jenny Mutterperl Wallier) and the University of Massachusetts Amherst has found.

Amherst College Professor Stanley J. Rabinowitz Translates and Edits Selection of Writings on Russian Ballet

November 12, 2008
Contact: Emanuel Costache ’09
Media Relations Intern
413/542-2321


AMHERST, Mass.—Stanley J. Rabinowitz, Henry Steele Commager Professor and Professor of Russian at Amherst College, is the translator and editor of a new selection of Russian critic Akim Volynsky’s essays on Russian ballet, titled Ballet’s Magic Kingdom: Selected Writings on Dance in Russia, 1911-1925 ($35, Yale UP, 2008).

Amherst College Political Science Professor Javier Corrales Advises Congress on Venezuela Policy

October 24, 2008               

AMHERST, Mass.—It is critical that the United States develop a counter-strategy to the “social power” diplomacy deployed by Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez and his government, but a hard-line response—such as military or economic aggression—is most certainly not the answer to Chavez’s rhetoric, Amherst College’s Javier Corrales, professor of political science, told a House Committee on Foreign Affairs subcommittee recently.

Amherst College Professor Ilán Stavans and Institute of Training and Development Receive $600K Grant to Promote Exchange Among U.S. and Latin American Countries

October 24, 2008           

AMHERST, Mass.—Ilán Stavans, Lewis-Sebring Professor in Latin American and Latino Culture and Five College 40th Anniversary Professor, has received a $600,000 grant from the U.S. State Department in support of an arts exchange program he will be directing for the Institute for Training and Development (ITD) in Amherst.

Amherst College Chemistry Professors Helen O. Leung and Mark D. Marshall Awarded Three-Year, $377,936 NSF Grant

October 10, 2008   
Contact: Emanuel Costache ’09
Media Relations Intern
413/542-2321

AMHERST, Mass.—Helen O. Leung and Mark D. Marshall, professors of chemistry at Amherst College, have been awarded a three-year, $377,936 grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF).

Amherst College Professor Thomas Dumm Publishes Inquiry into the Nature of Loneliness

October 1, 2008               
Contact: Emanuel Costache ’09
Media Relations Intern
413/542-2321


AMHERST, Mass.—Thomas Dumm, professor of political science at Amherst College, has just published Loneliness as a Way of Life ($24, Harvard University Press, 2008), an inquiry into what he calls “modern loneliness,” “loneliness that has permeated the modern world.”

Original Play by Professor Wendy Woodson Connects Imagery, Memory and More

October 13, 2015
By Rachel Rogol

Dora  

Ecology. Resistance fighters. A case study by Sigmund Freud. These are the underlying themes of Dora, an original performance about two people who meet and lose one another repeatedly against continually shifting landscapes of history and memory.

Written and performed by Wendy Woodson, Amherst's Roger C. Holden 1919 Professor of Theater and DanceDora simultaneously explores the relationship between its two characters and the many possible connections between images and human memory. "Dora is not a naturalistic or realistic play," Woodson says, "but rather a series of encounters."

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