Is DOMA Dead? An Amherst Expert Weighs in on the Future of Same-Sex Marriage

July 25, 2013

Professor Law, Jurisprudence and Social Thought Professor Martha Umphrey

On June 26 of this year, the Supreme Court of the United States (SCOTUS) made landmark decisions in two cases related to same-sex marriage: United States v. Windsor and Hollingsworth v. Perry.

With Chávez Absent, Venezuela Now Governed by Two Leaders, Says Amherst Poli Sci Prof

January 22, 2013

Presidential Inauguration Day: For citizens of the U.S. and most other democracies, the event signifies either a peaceful transfer of power to another administration or the opportunity for a re-elected president to make cabinet changes. But in Venezuela, this year’s presidential inauguration day, Jan. 10, was mired in controversy.

A rape roils India, and two Amherst experts weigh in

Sleep + Extra Darkness = Math Prof’s Formula for Combating Jet Lag

December 19, 2011

Travelers who have taken long flights eastward know it all too well: The sluggish, altogether unpleasant feeling one experiences waking up the first day in a new time zone. For some, that condition of desynchronosis, or jet lag, can be a mere annoyance. For others, it can be a real vacation headache, disrupting sleep patterns and digestion for days.

“There are no communities that are prepared for a 30-foot-tall wall of water.”

March 17, 2011

As the devastation of Japan’s earthquake, tsunami and nuclear crisis continue to play out on the other side of the globe, geology professor Tekla Harms and her colleagues in the department have been following the situation with great interest and sympathy.

Dueling: Deadly, Perhaps, But Hardly Irrational

April 9, 2010

Dueling may seem to be the ultimate irrational act, whether pistols at 20 paces or a swashbuckling sword fight at much closer quarters. But an AmherstCollege professor believes that duels were dangerous games that participants played for very rational reasons having to do with creditworthiness, honor and maintaining one’s social standing.

Professor on “Arab Spring”: Setting Up New, Legitimate Regimes Will Be Hard

March 31, 2010

On Dec. 17, 2010, a Tunisian street vendor set himself ablaze to protest political corruption and police brutality. One month later, following nationwide protests and strikes inspired by his self-immolation, Tunisian president Zine El Abidine Ben Ali abruptly resigned, ending his 23 years of autocratic rule.

Career Counselor

March 24, 2010

It’s job-hunting time for graduating seniors across the country, and AmherstCollege seniors are no exception.

A Safety Net for the Unemployed

February 25, 2010

As the Great Recession continues into 2010, one of its defining characteristics is persistent unemployment. Walter Nicholson, the Ward H. Patton Professor of Economics, is a leading expert on unemployment insurance systems, which not only help laid-off workers but also prop up economies by helping to replace lost purchasing power.

Copenhagen Bound

December 9, 2009

It’s Copenhagen or bust for two Copeland fellows this week. Chris Cuomo and Diana Pei Wu packed their bags and headed north to take part in the much-anticipated UN Climate Conference (COP15) in Denmark. Cuomo will participate with a delegation focused on the ethical dimensions of climate change, while Wu is affiliated with a delegation of grassroots community organizations pushing for “climate justice,” a movement aimed at eliminating unequal burdens that indigenous, low-income and other disadvantaged peoples suffer because of climate change.




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