Foundation and Corporate Relations

Faculty Grants

Sheila Jaswal, Tanya Leise and Amy Wagaman take part in consortial grant for biomathematics research

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A new collaborative, interdisciplinary research project will create a multi-campus biomathematics community dedicated to training young scholars in the field. “Mathematics used to be seen more as a service collaborating with physics and engineering, but I think more and more there’s been a big shift to more collaborations with biology and medicine,” Leise said. “It’s where the real interesting problems are emerging right now.” Read more »


Helen Leung and Mark marshall garner $220,000 NSF award for chemistry research

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The research funding will enable Professors Leung and Marshall, and their student research assistants to investigate pathways of chemical reactions by analyzing the rotational properties of molecules using Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy. The research team will be studying the interactions responsible for bringing molecules together for reaction. This work will help illuminate the basic principles behing the chemical transformation of matter and could potentially have direct application to the chemistry of the atmosphere and of combustion.


Katharine Sims Receives $100,000 NSF Award for Forest Conservation Research

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Assistant Professor of Economics Katharine Sim has received a grant to investigate the  dynamics behind current incentive-based forest conservation practices in Mexico. Her research will aid in developing successful strategies for reducing carbon emissions in developing countries. The economic theories explored through her research has important implications for policy design in Mexico and globally. Understanding how incentive-based conservation efforts are affected by spillovers is critical to the creation of future policies in developing countries.

karena mckinney awarded $626,024 from NSF for atmospheric instrumentation

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Karena McKinney's NSF award, made possible through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, will enable her to purchase a proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometer, one of only a handful worldwide.  With the specialized mass spectrometer, Karena and her students will take real-time measurements of airborne volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the field. Previously, McKinney and her fellow atmospheric chemists analyzed air samples using far less sophisticated techniques, and often had to bring the samples back to the lab to study. Read more »

Jonathan Friedman receives $350,000 nsf award for Quantum physics research

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Associate Professor of Physics Jonathan Friedman has received an  NSF award through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to continue his cutting-edge research of quantum mechanical effects in single-molecule nanomagnets and superconducting devices. Jonathan and his students plan to investigate whether  the tiny magnets can serve as qubits—the processing elements for quantum computers, by studying the magnets' behavior. Read more »

 

ROBERT BENEDETTO RECEIVES NSF GRANT TO STUDY QUESTIONS IN ARITHMETIC DYNAMICS

Rob Benedetto, Associate Professor of Mathematics

Associate Professor of Mathematics Robert L. Benedetto has been awarded a $151,059 NSF grant through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, to investigate boundedness questions in arithmetic dynamics, a field that involves the study of integers and prime numbers. Benedetto’s grant will enable him to study rational number solutions to a naturally arising set of polynomial equations. The award will support student summer research and will involve intense computer computations. Read more »

LARRY R. HUNTER AWARDED NSF GRANT FOR EXPERIMENTS THAT CHALLENGE OUR UNDERSTANDING OF THE PHYSICAL WORLD

Larry Hunter, Professor of Natural Sciences (Physics)

Stone Professor of Natural Sciences (Physics) Larry R. Hunter was awarded $359,733 by the National Science Foundation (NSF) to conduct experiments in two interrelated areas of physics. The first experiment will seek to determine the precise direction of the universe. Using sensitive apparatus known as magnetometers, this experiment will precisely measure the energy of a mercury nucleus by examining the alignment of its spin in relation to fixed stars. The second experiment involves one of the greatest experimental challenges in physics—the search for a permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) of the electron. For this experiment, Hunter will employ a ceramic material called gadolinium iron garnet to search for an electron EDM. The electric dipole moment, if found, would violate current thinking that the laws of physics are symmetrical. Read more »

AUSTIN SARAT RECEIVES FUNDING FROM NEH FOR TEACHER SEMINAR ON PUNISHMENT AND AMERICAN CULTURE

Austin Sarat, Professor of Jurisprudence and Political Science

William Nelson Cromwell Professor of Jurisprudence and Political Science Austin D. Sarat has received $167,979 in support from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) to conduct a summer seminar for high school teachers on punishment and its place in American culture and politics. Sarat will serve as Director for the five-week professional development seminar, which will be held on the Amherst campus in the summer of 2010.  Read more »

 

JOHN-PAUL BAIRD AWARDED NIH GRANTS TO RESEARCH HOW THE BRAIN REGULATES FOOD INTAKE

John-Paul Baird

Assistant Professor of Psychology John-Paul Baird received two awards totaling  $141,310 from the National Institutes of Health through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. The awards will fund equipment and a lab technician to aid Baird’s research to identify neurons in the brain that process taste and digestion information. Using brain recordings, Baird will examine how neurons respond to neuropeptides (compounds in the brain made up of two or more amino acids) that influence how the body intakes food. Baird’s research will advance understanding of the biochemical processes governing appetite, and may help identify potential drugs for treatment of food-related disorders.  Read more »

DAVID S. HALL AWARDED NSF GRANT TO INVESTIGATE BOSE-EINSTEIN CONDENSATES

Associate Professor Physics David S. Hall has received a three-year, $469,086 grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. The award will support Hall’s studies of gases cooled to a billionth of a degree above absolute zero—the lowest possible temperature in the universe—and will allow him to build on work done by legendary physicists Satyendra Nath Bose and Albert Einstein in the 1920s.  Read more »

KRISTIN BUMILLER RECEIVES VICTORIA SCHUCK AWARD FOR BEST BOOK ON WOMEN AND POLITICS

Kristin Bumiller, Professor of Political Science and Women's and Gender Studies

Professor of Political Science and Women’s and Gender Studies Kristin Bumiller received the 2009 Victoria Schuck Award for best book published in the previous calendar year on women and politics. Bumiller’s book, In an Abusive State: How Neoliberalism Appropriated the Feminist Movement Against Sexual Violence chronicles the evolution of efforts to stop sexual violence in the US, and provides a critical analysis of the impact of the feminist campaign’s approach toward combating sexual violence on social policy. Read more »

EDWARD MELILLO CHOSEN AS 2009 SHERMAN EMERGING SCHOLAR

Edward Melillo

Assistant Professor of History and Environmental Studies Edward Melillo was chosen as the 2009 Sherman Emerging Scholar by the University of North Carolina Wilmington’s Department of History.  According to Taylor Fain, chair of the Sherman committee, “The award is given each year to an exceptional young scholar whose research is highly relevant to the current global situation and who is able to put important international issues into a meaningful historical context.” Sherman traveled to UNC Wilmington in October to deliver the 2009 Sherman Emerging Scholar Lecture, “Green Revolutions: Agricultural Expansion and the Global Environment in Three Centuries.” Read more »

JILL MILLER AND RACHEL LEVIN AWARDED FIVE-YEAR NSF AWARD FOR RESEARCH ON EVOLUTION OF SEXUAL STRATEGIES IN FLOWERING PLANTS

Rachel Levin and Jill Miller

Assistant Professor of Biology Jill S. Miller (right) and Visiting Professor of Biology Rachel A. Levin have together received a five-year, $400,000 grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF). The award will support the pair’s continuing research on phylogenetic molecular systematics and the ecology and evolution of reproductive systems in angiosperms, or flowering plants. Read more »



ALLEN GUTTMANN WINS LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD FROM INTERNATIONAL SOCIETY OF OLYMPIC HISTORIANS

Allen Guttmann, Professor of English and American Studies

Professor of English and American Studies Allen Guttmann has been honored with a prestigious lifetime achievement award from the International Society of Olympic Historians (ISOH). During a special two-day meeting of the group in Cologne, Germany, in August, Guttmann delivered an address titled “Ludic Diffusion as Cultural Imperialism?” and received an honorary ISOH diploma, as well as a bronze bust of Pierre de Coubertin, the founder of the modern Olympic Games. Read more »