• Encourage your child to communicate and advocate for themselves (we understand that this is hard for parents/guardians who have had to do this for their children in K-12 - but it really is in their best interest! Roleplay with, or coach your children if they are feeling concerned about this).
  • Tell your child to start the process of registering and applying for accommodations early! The sooner a student discloses and makes a request for accommodations, the less anxious they may feel about the process. 
  • Share with your child any concerns you have, and issues you think need to be discussed with the Accessibility Services Office. Remind them that such conversations are confidential and that they have the power to make decisions with regards to their own disclosure and requests for accommodations. 
  • If you're making a campus visit with your child, don't be insulted if you are not invited to sit in on a meeting with Accessibility Services. Some students may prefer that this meeting be a private one.
  • If you do attend a meeting, give your child the opportunity to speak for themselves. Wait until after they have had an opportunity to ask all questions before asking your own, or addressing any concerns that were not met.
  • Acknowledge and support your child's choices, and be open to changes.
  • Promote exploration of new opportunities and new relationships.
  • Let your child know that you are there if they need it, but also help them to identify the resources available to them on campus (faculty office hours, peer tutors, the Writing Center, librarians, class deans, the Counseling Center, case managers, workshops...)
  • If you would like to communicate with the staff of Accessibility Services, involve your child in the conversation so that everyone is on the same page. The staff is limited in what information can be shared with parents due to confidentiality provisions of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA). We also understand some students may appreciate having their parents involved in conversations in which they are seeking strategy guidance. When this is the case, the student must provide written consent, either via email or a signed release of information form (which can be found in the Forms section of this website).
  • Finally, be prepared for major stumbling blocks and bumps in the road. Remember that we often learn and grow the most when we are challenged in new situations.