Hurricane Irene

Submitted by Andy Anderson on Thursday, 9/1/2011, at 9:38 AM

amherst_streets

Submitted by Andy Anderson on Wednesday, 1/5/2011, at 11:56 PM
The Streets of Amherst

amherst_streets_directional_ellipses

Submitted by Andy Anderson on Wednesday, 1/5/2011, at 11:42 PM
The standard-deviational ellipses of the streets of Amherst, MA
Submitted by Andy Anderson on Monday, 4/19/2010, at 9:43 PM
A digital elevation model of the gigantic Martian volcano Olympus Mons, with an elevation profile. Created with ArcGIS using MOLA data.
Submitted by Andy Anderson on Monday, 4/19/2010, at 9:06 PM
This is a pole-to-pole view of Martian topography from the first MOLA global topographic model [Smith et al., Science, 1999]. The slice runs from the north pole (left) to the south pole (right) along the 0° longitude line. The figure highlights the pole-to-pole slope of 0.036°, such that the south pole has a higher elevation than the north pole by ~6 km. This global-scale slope was likely present for most of Mars' history and controlled the surface and subsurface transport of water indicated by images of outflow channels and valley networks. The regional high (in orange) in mid-southern hemisphere latitudes corresponds to the western edge of the topographic annulus that encircles the massive Hellas impact basin. In the figure warm colors correspond to high elevations and cold colors correspond to low elevations. Note the exceedingly flat northern hemisphere in blue. (Image credit: MOLA Science Team, http://ssed.gsfc.nasa.gov/tharsis/mola.html )

Gorganum Chaos and Probable Water Gullies

Submitted by Andy Anderson on Monday, 2/22/2010, at 12:13 AM
"Evidence for Recent Liquid Water on Mars: Gullies in Gorgonum Chaos" http://www.msss.com/mars_images/moc/june2000/gorgonum/

Water Content of Martian Soil

Submitted by Andy Anderson on Sunday, 2/21/2010, at 11:57 PM
"This map shows the estimated lower limit of the water content of the upper meter of Martian soil." http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/odyssey/news/whatsnew/index.cfm?FuseAction=ShowNews&NewsID=264

Cydonian "Face" on Mars

Submitted by Andy Anderson on Sunday, 2/21/2010, at 11:43 PM
"New high-resolution images and 3D altimetry from NASA's Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft reveal the Face on Mars for what it really is: a mesa." http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2001/ast24may_1.htm

Mars at Opposition 2003

Submitted by Andy Anderson on Sunday, 2/21/2010, at 6:44 PM
Hubble Heritage Image: "NASA's Hubble Space Telescope snapped this portrait of Mars within minutes of the planet's closest approach to Earth in nearly 60,000 years. This image was made from a series of exposures taken between 5:35 a.m. and 6:20 a.m. EDT Aug. 27 with Hubble's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2. In this picture, the red planet is 34,647,420 miles (55,757,930 km) from Earth. This sharp, natural-color view of Mars reveals several prominent Martian features, including the largest volcano in the solar system, Olympus Mons; a system of canyons called Valles Marineris; an immense dark marking called Solis Lacus; and the southern polar ice cap." http://hubblesite.org/newscenter/archive/releases/2003/22/image/a/

Obama Views the World

Submitted by Andy Anderson on Tuesday, 6/30/2009, at 8:03 AM
President Barack Obama looks at a map donated to the White House by the National Geographic Society, in the Oval Office, June 10, 2009. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza) Source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/whitehouse/3647637535/