Bio

Submitted by Amanda E. Herbert on Wednesday, 7/6/2016, at 3:40 PM

Amanda E. Herbert is Assistant Director at the Folger Institute of the Folger Shakespeare Library, where she runs the Fellowships Program.  She holds the M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in History from the Johns Hopkins University, where she worked under the direction of Prof. John Marshall, and completed her B.A. with Distinction in History and Germanics at the University of Washington, where she worked with Prof. F.J. Levy.  She was the 2015-2016 inaugural Molina Fellow in the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences at the Huntington Library in San Marino, California.  Her first book, Female Alliances: Gender, Identity, and Friendship in Early Modern Britain, was published by Yale University Press in 2014, and won the Best Book Award from the Society for the Study of Early Modern Women.  The first book-length historical study of female friendship and alliance for the early modern period, Female Alliances demonstrates the importance of women’s social networks not only to early modern women themselves, but to the building of the British Atlantic world.   She has published articles in the Journal of Social History as well as Early American Studies, and her fellowships include grants from the Yale Center for British Art, the Lewis Walpole Library, the Folger Shakespeare Library, the Quaker Collection of Haverford College, the American Antiquarian Society, and the Huntington Library.  She is at work on her second book project, Spa: Faith, Public Health, and Science in Early Modern Britain, which seeks to refigure and reclaim the early modern urban spa, not just as a place of elite sociability, but as an important site for the study of the history of public health.  She lives in Baltimore, Maryland. 

Female Alliances: Gender, Identity, and Friendship in Early Modern Britain (Yale, 2014)

Female Alliances: Gender, Identity, and Friendship in Early Modern Britain (Yale 2014)

Female Alliances: Gender, Identity, and Friendship in Early Modern Britain (Yale 2014)