Submitted by Paul D. Matteson on Monday, 6/22/2015, at 7:59 AM

Paul Matteson's research explores methods for generating inventive personal movement within collaborative choreography.  He lived for many years in New York City and was a principal dancer with the internationally touring Bill T. Jones / Arnie Zane Dance Company from 2008-2012. His duet collaborations with Jennifer Nugent were presented in NYC by Danspace Project, Symphony Space, Dance Theater Workshop, and received National Performance Network (NPN) Support for performances at The Colony Theater in Miami, Florida.  A NYC-ARTS Channel Thirteen profile on Jennifer and Paul is now available online (http://watch.thirteen.org/video/2248418477/).  From 2000-2005, Paul was a member of David Dorfman Dance and Race Dance, receiving a New York Dance and Performance Award (BESSIE) for his "Body of Work" in 2002.  He also performed for Terry Creach, Peter Schmitz, Kota Yamazaki, Chamecki/Lerner, Jamie Cunningham, Neta Pulvermacher, Susan Sgorbati, Helena Franzen, and Keith Johnson.   

Paul joined Amherst College and Mount Holyoke College in the fall of 2012 as an Assistant Professor of Dance and is a 2014 Massachusetts Cultural Council Award recipient in Choreography (http://www.massculturalcouncil.org/gallery/artistDetail.asp?App=20142289).  His most recent group work, slow slip down, features powerful performers and teachers in the Five College Dance Department with performances at the Movement Research Spring Festival in NYC, Amherst College, and at the A.P.E. Gallery in Northampton, MA. His duet collaboration with Sara Hook, Bored House Guests, premiered in October 2014 at The West End Theater in NYC as part of the Soaking Wet festival and received wonderful reviews.  Other recent projects include collaborations with Wendy Woodson, Raja Feather Kelly, Jim Morrow, Jennifer Polins, Karl Rogers, composer Eric Sawyer, and composer Ted Coffey.   This summer, he will be collaborating on a trio with Tzveta Kassabova (Middlebury College) and Elena Demyanenko (Bennington College).  During his upcoming sabbatical, he will focus on a new solo.

In the summers, Paul regularly teaches at The American Dance Festival, The Bates Dance Festival, and The Florida Dance Festival.   This summer he will be teaching at the Salt Dance Festival (http://dance.utah.edu/newsevents/saltdancefest/) and co-creating the NOW Festival with Jennifer Polins, Andrea Olsen, and Peter Schmitz in Amherst, MA from June 26-28 (https://www.facebook.com/events/1598609670378665/). 

Reviews for Bored House Guests:

http://www.artsjournal.com/dancebeat/2014/10/choreographers-gets-their-feet-wet/

http://www.culturebot.org/2014/10/22221/soaking-wet-on-the-uws/

http://www.dance-enthusiast.com/features/view/soaking-wet-bored-house-guests

Sample Class Descriptions:

Technique

An investigation of off-balanced and precise multi-focused movement.  We'll begin by gathering our attention, generating warmth in the body, and encouraging an expansive attitude towards movement possibility.  We'll then ease into a series of buoyant sequences spiraling in and out of the floor and up into the air.  Interplay with live music offers a rich exchange of texture, dynamics, and nuance. 

Partnering Possibilities

A toolbox of methods for partnering. As a safe and supportive ensemble we'll explore negative space, responses to touch, and various ways of harnessing momentum. By a quick bridging of improvisation into set work—followed by imaginative reconstruction steps—we'll develop dances that both honor and challenge compositional and performance standards.

Making Dances

Strategies and approaches for developing choreography.  Solo, duet and small group exercises in class will generate inventive movement that will become source material for each student in the making of a new dance.  These dances will be performed in various stages of development throughout the semester in three works-in-progress showings.  Emphasis will be placed on continuous revision and a willingness to throw the creative process into the public forum as a means of gaining information for further work.