The Associated Kyoto Program (AKP)

The Associated Kyoto Program is a two-semester study-abroad program at Doshisha University in Kyoto, Japan, sponsored by a consortium of American colleges and universities. The Program maintains high academic standards and dedication to a sound liberal arts education for which its sponsoring institutions are known. The forty to fifty students accepted each year study the Japanese language intensively and take courses in English on Japan, mainly in the humanities and social sciences.

Amherst College and Japan

After more than two centuries of isolation, Japan finally opened its door to the world in 1868. A few years earlier, a young man named Shimeta Neesima, later known as Joseph Hardy Neesima, traveled from Japan to America; by 1867 he had found his way to Amherst College, where he received his Bachelor of Arts degree three years later at the age of twenty-seven. Only by illegally boarding a ship named Berlin bound for China was he able, in 1864, to leave Japan.

The Japanese Language Program

History of Amherst College and Japan

By Ray Moore In the 1870s, when Amherst College first encountered Japan, the Japanese were seeking knowledge from the West and Americans were trying to convert the world to Christianity. A key figure in the early contacts was Julius H. Seelye, professor and president (1876-1890), ordained minister in the Dutch Reform Church and a member of the American Board of Foreign Missions. In 1871 he welcomed to Amherst members of Japan’s Iwakura diplomatic mission, who were seeking a system of education to support the building a modern nation.

Choosing to Survive

Picturing Tokyo

By Emily Gold Boutilier

The idea for the Mead’s current special exhibition arose, appropriately, from an undergraduate course. First taught in 2009, “Reinventing Tokyo: The Art, Literature and Politics of Japan’s Modern Capital” was conceived by three professors—Trent Maxey, Samuel Morse and Timothy Van Compernolle—as an interdisciplinary look at how Tokyo has changed over the past century and a half.  

Kristin Young Historical Context

Submitted by Kristin P. Young on Monday, 11/28/2011, at 11:01 AM

Kristin Young Genre

Submitted by Kristin P. Young on Monday, 11/7/2011, at 1:28 PM

Young and the Old

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