Economics professor calls for more mindfulness, contemplation, in new book

With his new book, Contemplative Practices in Higher Education: Powerful Methods to Transform Teaching and Learning (Jossey-Bass, co-authored with Mirabai Bush) Daniel Barbezat continues his mission to encourage colleges and universities to become centers of contemplation and self-reflection for students.

Thinking Compassionate Thoughts

By Peter Rooney

[Faculty] Chances are, the first words that you associate with mindfulness are not physics or economics. So how is it that two Amherst faculty members from those fields are in charge of two organizations devoted to the concepts of mindfulness and contemplative practice?

“Fortunate births, perhaps?” offers Daniel Barbezat, professor of economics and executive director of the Northampton-based Center for Contemplative Mind in Society.

A Meeting of the Mindful to introduce compassion, kindness in schools worldwide

Submitted on Tuesday, 5/28/2013, at 4:46 PM

May 28, 2013 • By Peter Rooney

AMHERST, Mass. – The Amherst College campus is forging ever stronger links with the burgeoning mindfulness movement, in academia and beyond.

The most recent example is an initiative—funded with a $1 million grant from the Dalai Lama and spearheaded by a renowned physicist from Amherst College and a group of 30 leading minds in fields such as education, neuroscience and childhood development—to integrate the core principles of compassion and kindness into a secular ethics curriculum that can be taught worldwide, to people of all ages.

My Life: Arthur Zajonc

Always Mindful

Submitted by Katherine D. Duke on Thursday, 8/13/2009, at 1:57 PM

“How come we all can’t be just a little bit more like monks here?”

Andrew Kriete ’11E has been wondering about this ever since he returned to Amherst after four months practicing meditation in a Tibetan Buddhist monastery in New York. He was speaking on a student panel on April 23 as part of the college’s first Day of Mindfulness—a series of events inviting members of the college community to explore various contemplative practices. In the Babbott Room of the Octagon, nine students discussed how and why they’re trying to be mindful in their academic and social lives.