Last Man Standing

By George Bria ’38

Introducing me at a journalism event in New York, the moderator asked, “How old are you now, George?” I said 96 (that was three years ago), and the auditorium burst into applause. It was the loudest cheer of the night, as I recall, and nothing had happened yet except the mention of my age.

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Rosbottom Reflects on the Success of "When Paris Went Dark"

Submitted on Tuesday, 10/21/2014, at 4:57 PM

“What was it like for the world’s most beloved city to be occupied by the world’s most heinous ideology?”

That, says Professor Ronald C. Rosbottom, is the question at the heart of his new book, When Paris Went Dark: The City of Light Under German Occupation, 1940–1944, which has drawn critical acclaim from The Wall Street Journal and the Minneapolis-St. Paul Star Tribune, among other media outlets, and was longlisted for a 2014 National Book Award in the nonfiction category.

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WW II Veteran to Receive His Diploma at Amherst's Commencement May 26

Submitted on Thursday, 5/16/2013, at 12:44 PM

May 15, 2013

Arthur J. Ourieff, middle row, third from right, in the 1942 Amherst cross- country team photo

Arthur J. Ourieff’s first semester at college started out like any other. He studied hard, occasionally goofed off with his friends and even managed to find time to go on a few dates.

The Impact of Black Soldiers and Amherst College on the Civil Rights Movement

Submitted on Thursday, 3/1/2012, at 10:51 AM

Khary Polk, the Robert E. Keiter 1957 Postdoctoral Fellow and visiting assistant professor of black studies at Amherst completed his doctoral dissertation on the African-American soldier at New York University last summer and is currently adapting the dissertation into book form. We recently spoke with Polk about the upcoming work, which he said will examine “how discourses of race and sexuality intersected within the figure of the African American soldier in the 20th century, and how black soldiers, in particular, found senses of embattled agency through their military travels outside of the United States.”

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Amherst College to Award Honorary Bachelor’s Degrees to Four Former Students Who Served in World War II

May 17, 2011

By Katherine Duke ’05

Richard Hunter ’44, J. Bruce Duncan ’45, Frank R.L. Egloff ’46 and C. Burns Roehrig ’45 would have graduated from Amherst College more than 65 years ago, had not World War II intervened.

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Grant Awarded to Amherst Archives to Process Papers of Key WWII Rebuilders

Amherst College Archives & Special Collections

The National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC), a unit of the National Archives reporting to the Archivist of the United States, has awarded $56,744 to Frost Library’s Archives and Special Collections to process the personal papers of three men who played key roles in the economic and political reconstruction of belligerent nations after World War II. The materials belonged to Charles R. Kades, one of the writers of the Japanese constitution; Karl Loewenstein, a legal scholar instrumental in developing a constitution and civil administration in Germany and professor in Amherst’s political science department from 1936 to 1961; and Willard L. Thorp ’20, assistant secretary of state for economic affairs under President Truman and one of the principal architects of the Marshall Plan, who taught in his alma mater’s economics department from 1927 to 1936 and also served as a trustee. The NHPRC funding will enable the library staff to arrange and describe the papers according to current professional standards and apply existing in-house procedures for processing, said Michael Kelly, head of Archives and Special Collections.

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