David Hanneke Wins Cottrell College Science Award

The Research Corporation for Science Advancement (RCSA) has named David Hanneke, assistant professor of physics, winner of one of the organization’s Cottrell College Science Awards (CCSA). The prize, which began on July 1, provides $35,000 in support of the research of a junior faculty member in the physical sciences. 

Karen Sánchez-Eppler Elected Vice President of C19: The Society of Nineteenth-Century Americanists

Karen Sánchez-Eppler, professor of American Studies and English, has been elected vice president of C19: The Society of Nineteenth-Century Americanists. Her vice presidential term began on July 1 and will continue for two years, after which she will serve for an additional two years as president of the society.

Randall R. Griffey Wins Award for Excellence from Association of Art Museum Curators

The Association of Art Museum Curators (AAMC) recently announced its 2011 Awards for Excellence in museum catalogues, articles and exhibitions—“the only awards where curators honor their fellow curators.” AAMC members chose an essay by Randall R. Griffey, the Mead Art Museum’s curator of American art, to receive the award for Outstanding Catalogue Essay.

Lester Hu ’13 Presents Research at American Musicological Society Meeting

By Katherine Duke ’05

While still a junior here at Amherst, Zhuqing “Lester” Hu ’13 recently earned an honor that’s usually reserved for advanced graduate students and professors: He was invited to present an original research paper at the spring meeting of the New England chapter of the 3,600-member American Musicological Society (AMS-NE). The meeting took place on April 14 at Mount Holyoke College. Hu’s paper, titled “Towards Modal Coherence: ‘Modal Chromaticism’ in Gesualdo’s Two ‘O vos omnes’ Settings,” analyzes a pair of works by a mysterious and eccentric figure in Late Renaissance music.

Howell Chickering Receives Excellence in Teaching Award

June 17, 2011

Howell D. “Chick” Chickering, the G. Armour Craig Professor of Language and Literature, has received the 2011 CARA Award for Excellence in Teaching Medieval Studies from the Medieval Academy of America (MAA). Chickering said he was delighted to have received the award, which he described as “national public validation of [his] work as a teacher at Amherst College.”

Luca Grillo Receives Mention from Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation

Luca Grillo, assistant professor of classics and European studies, received an honorable mention “for excellence of scholarly and teaching achievements” in the recent competition for the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation’s Career Enhancement Fellowship for Junior Faculty.

Deborah Gewertz Honored By Association of Social Anthropologists in Oceania

Deborah Gewertz, the G. Henry Whitcomb 1874 Professor of Anthropology, and her research collaborator, Frederick Errington, a Distinguished Professor of Anthropology, Emeritus, at Trinity College in Hartford, Conn., were jointly named honorary fellows of the Association of Social Anthropologists in Oceania (ASAO) at the organization’s annual meeting Feb. 9 to 12. Including Gewertz and Errington, the distinction is currently held by 16 scholars in recognition of their distinguished contributions to the field of social anthropology in Oceania.

John E. Drabinski is Co-Editor of Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy

John E. Drabinski, visiting associate professor of Black studies, has recently taken over as co-editor, with Oklahoma City University Professor Scott Davidson, of the Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy.

Black Studies and History Professor’s Book Wins Prize

November 19, 2010

Schooling Citizens: The Struggle for African American Education in Antebellum America, by Hilary Moss, assistant professor of black studies and history, has been honored with the History of Education Society’s (HES) 2010 award for the year’s most outstanding book on the history of education.

The HES Book Prize Committee annually solicits nominations for the award, and this year, 22 publications were nominated. The group first narrowed their choice to five finalists and then reread these volumes carefully, evaluating each book’s thesis and supporting arguments, the work’s significance to the field, its use of sources and its aesthetic qualities. Schooling Citizens came out on top because the committee believed it to be “an important contribution to the historiography of American education, focusing as it does on the purpose of public education,” said HES Book Prize Committee Chair Amy Thompson McCandless, professor of history and dean of the Graduate School at the College of Charleston, in an announcement about the prize. “Well-argued and well written, it deals with issues of race, class, ethnicity, religion and gender that continue to confront educators from pre-school to post-doctoral levels in the 21st century.”

Simpson Lecturer Melia to Edit New Astronomy Journal

Fulvio Melia

Fulvio Melia, distinguished professor in the Physics, Astronomy and Applied Mathematics departments at the University of Arizona, who is visiting Amherst this fall as a John Woodruff Simpson Lecturer, has been named editor of a recently launched astronomy journal.

Melia was appointed editor-in-chief of European Astronomy Studies Development, an open access journal that seeks to publish high-quality, peer-reviewed, original manuscripts in all fields of astronomy and astrophysics, with a particular focus on computational astronomy: mathematical and astronomy techniques and methodology, simulations, modeling and numerical results and computational techniques in instrumentation.

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