Wall Street Journal: Talking Basketball, in Spanish, Is Definitely No Slam Dunk

Ilan Stavans, a professor of Latino culture at Amherst College, weighed in on the emergence of the new language “Basketball Spanish” in an article in the Wall Street Journal. “Broadcast Basketball Spanish is yet another variant of Spanglish,” he explained . “Spanglish is a very fluid phenomenon. There’s a lot of improvisation. It’s a kind of jazzy exchange.”

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Wall Street Journal: Some Reasons We Honor Lincoln on Presidents Day

In a letter to the editor on the Wall Street Journal’s website, Hadley Arkes, Edward N. Ney Professor in American Institutions, argued that President Abraham Lincoln had more than enough qualifications for office, contrary to what the writer of an earlier Journal piece had asserted. “In the measuring of statecraft, the capacity of a leader to articulate the moral and political ends of the regime he would preserve, would indeed be counted as experience most relevant,” Arkes wrote.

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Dow Jones: Venezuela's Economy Struggled In 2010 But Its Bonds Thrived

Poli sci professor Javier Corrales commented on the state of Venezuela’s economy in this piece that ran in the Wall Street Journal, among other outlets. “As the government’s popularity declines, quite significantly, its institutional control has risen,” he said. “In terms of a functioning economic market, this is a market in decline. It’s remarkable how much capital flight there has been. And it’s because of the arbitrary policies of the government.”

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Wall Street Journal: Behind the Scenes of Argentina’s Power Couple

The Wall Street Journal consulted political science professor Javier Corrales for an analysis of the president of Argentina and her late husband. “She was out there and Néstor was more reserved,” Corrales told the paper. “One interpretation was that he was more low-profile. The other interpretation was that he was the brain and she the mouth.”

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Wall Street Journal: When Justice Comes Naturally

The latest book by Hadley Arkes, Edward N. Ney Professor in American Institutions, was featured in this favorable review. “Judges could benefit from Mr. Arkes’s subtle and meticulous arguments if only by incorporating a few of his ideas into their own broad views—not least the principle of prudence that he defends throughout Constitutional Illusions & Anchoring Truths,” wrote reviewer John O. McGinnis.

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