Making Sense of Calamity

By William Sweet

[Courses] How are we all going to die? There are so many options: killer tsunamis, mile-wide meteors, avian flu, earthquakes, dirty bombs. If you need a little distraction from this gloom, maybe it’s time to take in a movie. The Poseidon Adventure? Armageddon? Melancholia?

Ours seems to be an age of permanent catastrophe, with our time split between suffering disaster, worrying about it, making plans to minimize it and arguing over why it happened.

Senior Assembly 2012

Very Hot Type

By Caroline J. Hanna

It was a banner winter for faculty authors. Political science’s Javier Corrales; law, jurisprudence and social thought’s Lawrence Douglas; and physics’ Jonathan Friedman all won accolades for their writing.

Brilliant, Wily and Quietly Bold

The Vices, by Lawrence Douglas, the James J. Grosfeld Professor of Law, Jurisprudence and Social Thought (Other Press)

Reviewed by Lauren Groff ’01

Professor Lawrence Douglas Publishes Two New Works of Fiction

Submitted on Wednesday, 8/17/2011, at 4:24 PM

Interview by Katherine Duke '05

In Chapter Five of The Girl with the Sturgeon TattooSwedish author Lars Arffssen’s new thriller about an investigation into serial reindeer killings and the secret history of the UKEA furniture company—protagonist Mikael Blomberg sneaks into the vast but messy apartment of the brilliant young hacker Lizzy Salamander and finds, on her nightstand, a copy of the novel The Vices, by Lawrence Douglas. “Must order it on Amazon,” he thinks.

Such conspicuous product placement is a treat for readers who are in on the joke: that Arffssen and Douglas are one and the same. Aug. 30 will mark the release of Sturgeon Tattoo, a parody of The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo and the other novels in Stieg Larsson’s bestselling crime thriller trilogy. The Vices, released on Aug. 16, is—like Douglas’s first novel, The Catastrophist—set partly at a fictional (but familiar) liberal arts college in Massachusetts.

The Last Nazi War-Crimes Trial