Black German culture, history highlighted at Amherst-sponsored conference

Submitted on Tuesday, 2/18/2014, at 3:31 PM

By Peter Rooney

As more African-Americans are realizing they have German roots, and as Germans expand the notion of what it means to be German, a new academic discipline dedicated to examining the Black German experience recently had its third International Conference at Amherst College.

Amherst College’s Frost Library to Host Fall Book Party for Faculty Authors on Oct. 28

October 21, 2010

AMHERST, Mass.—On Thursday, Oct. 28, at 4 p.m. in the first-floor Periodicals Area, Amherst College’s Frost Library will host a fall book party recognizing new works by Amherst faculty in the humanities.

Professor Christian Rogowski Publishes Book on Weimar Cinema

Rogowski

Professor of German Christian Rogowski is editor of the new book The Many Faces of Weimar Cinema: Rediscovering Germany’s Filmic Legacy (Boydell & Brewer). Published on June 15, 2010, the book presents up-to-date perspectives on German filmmaking from the years of the Weimar Republic (1919-1933).

Traditionally, Weimar cinema has been viewed reductively—equated with only a limited number of canonical films (for example, Robert Wiene’s The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari and F.W. Murnau’s Nosferatu), several auteurist filmmakers and the expressionist film style. But in recent decades, researchers have uncovered a wealth of source material that shows Weimar cinema to be richer and more diverse than typically thought. The new book’s 18 contributors, including Rogowski himself, highlight lesser-known directors and producers, popular genres, nonfiction film and experiments in the artistic avant-garde. “The essays collected in the volume seek to redress the neglect such genre films have suffered,” he says. “Few have survived; even fewer are available outside archives, with English subtitles, for an international audience.” The essays also discuss Weimar films in terms of broader issues such as gender and sexuality; national identity and transnational collaboration; filmmaking technologies, including the introduction of sound to films; and connections with other media and art forms.

Not Just Theory