Amherst College’s Mead Art Museum Launches Project to Conserve Rare Tibetan Art Pieces

January 8, 2010                                 

AMHERST, Mass.—The Mead Art Museum at Amherst College has embarked on an ambitious project to conserve six Tibetan tangkas, or cloth paintings of Buddhist deities mounted on silk scrolls.

Amherst College’s Mead Art Museum Launches New Episodes of Museum Audio Tours

February 18, 2009     
Contact: Karen Cardinal
Accounting, Web and Marketing Manager, Mead Art Museum
413/542-2551


AMHERST, Mass.— Amherst College’s Mead Art Museum has launched a series of new episodes of its Museum Audio Tours podcast. Recorded by students in the museum’s volunteer docent program, the episodes explore works of art that are currently on display.

The Mead's Mummy Mystery

Submitted on Wednesday, 10/30/2013, at 10:13 AM

by William Sweet

The Mead’s mummy is missing.

Truth be told, the 2,600-year-old mummy case has likely been empty for the entire half-century that it’s been with the Mead Art Museum. But records show that it once contained a preserved human body. This leaves museum staff with a mystery worth unraveling even as they prepare an ancient artifact for exhibit.

As with any good mystery, the more one learns about the Mead’s mummy case, the more questions arise.

Permanent Adoptions

By Emily Gold Boutilier

When the Mead Art Museum chooses to acquire a new work of art, it takes the long view. “We look at a 500-year window,” says Director Elizabeth E. Barker. “We’ll have it forever. It’s like a permanent adoption.”

Given the serious commitment involved, curators at the Mead take no acquisition lightly. They consider quality, condition and importance, as well as how a particular work relates to the other items in the museum, Barker says.

Reinventing Tokyo: Ambitious Exhibition at Amherst’s Mead Art Museum Chronicles Tokyo’s Many Transformations

Submitted on Tuesday, 10/9/2012, at 5:04 PM

October 4, 2012

By Peter Rooney

Tokyo_400
Night in Shinjuku (Shinjuku yakei), from the series Fifteen Scenes of Last Tokyo in Original Woodcut (Tokyo kaiko zue), by Maekawa Senpan (1888–1960), is one of the images featured in the Mead Art Museum's exhibition Reinventing Tokyo: Japan’s Largest City in the Artistic Imagination.

AMHERST, Mass.—Reinventing Tokyo: Japan’s Largest City in the Artistic Imagination, on view through December, is the most ambitious exhibition in the history of Amherst College’s Mead Art Museum. It is the first exhibition in the United States, and perhaps the Western Hemisphere, to artistically examine Tokyo and its various transformations—by fire in the 19th century, the catastrophic earthquake of 1923, the firebombing in World War II and modern industrialization and development—over the past 145 years.

Randall R. Griffey Wins Award for Excellence from Association of Art Museum Curators

The Association of Art Museum Curators (AAMC) recently announced its 2011 Awards for Excellence in museum catalogues, articles and exhibitions—“the only awards where curators honor their fellow curators.” AAMC members chose an essay by Randall R. Griffey, the Mead Art Museum’s curator of American art, to receive the award for Outstanding Catalogue Essay.

Showstopper

Visit the Mead Art Museum

Thangka see the light

By Adam Gerchick ’13

Mead Art Museum Receives $148,000 Grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services to Fund Collection Digitization Project

Submitted on Monday, 8/15/2011, at 4:38 PM
meadphotographer
Photographer David Dashiell arranges a print for digitization at the Mead Art Museum.

AMHERST, Mass. — The Mead Art Museum at Amherst College has received a $148,256 Museums for America Program Grant from The Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) to create digital images of more than 10,000 objects in its collection, including prints, drawings, photographs, sculpture, furniture, ceramics and silver.

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