The Next Generation of Art Historians: Amherst Students Honored at Symposium

March 26, 2015
By Madeline Ruoff '18

Law, Morales, Johnson
Maggie Law '15, Pablo Sebastián Morales '16 and Rachel Johnson '15

Three emerging art historians at Amherst College have been recognized for their research. Rachel Johnson '15, Maggie Law '15 and Pablo Sebastián Morales '16 gave presentations on 17th-century European art at "Baroque Brilliance," the first ever student symposia held at the Bruce Museum in Greenwich, CT, on February 7 & 21 and moderated by art history scholars from Manhattanville College and Columbia University.

Johnson, Law and Morales began their research long before the symposium in Professor Nicola Courtright’s Fall 2013 course “Baroque Art in Italy, France, Spain, and the Spanish Netherlands." Each student tailored their final paper from that class to fit the symposium guidelines.

See Amherst Students' Award-Winning Experimental Films

Submitted on Friday, 3/20/2015, at 10:11 AM

Dershimer

Presentiments
by Miranda Dershimer ’15E

Rodriguez

Exposure (Thoughts Occasioned By)
by Jose Rodriguez 15E

 

 

 

 

 

 

  


At this year’s Five College Student Film and Video Festival, hosted by Hampshire College, Amherst students Miranda Dershimer ’15E and Jose Rodriguez ’15E won awards for short films they wrote, directed, filmed and edited. 

Dershimer won in the Best Experimental category for her visually evocative film Presentiments, and Rodriguez’s Exposure (Thoughts Occasioned By) was named the best submission from Amherst College. Both films were awarded in the “experimental” category, a category previously dominated by Hampshire College students’ films since the festival’s inception in 2007.

Student Life Takes Center Stage in Thesis Play

February 20, 2015
By Rachel Rogol

Grow Up
Four student actors embrace during a rehearsal for "Grow Up, Already!"

Living with roommates, choosing classes, forming new friendships, studying for exams—these are things you might expect to see in a play about student life in a college setting. But Grow Up, Already!—a senior honors project by Valerie Rodriguez ’15—dives deeper, tackling harder themes, including mental health, issues of identity, suicide and more.

The Common Wins NEA Literature Grant to Develop Programming for Web, Classrooms

February 16, 2015

By Madeline Ruoff ’18

2014_09_24_RM_TheCommonselects_117_400x267.jpg

The Common founder and editor Jennifer Acker ’00 (second from left) laughs
with students and Diana Babineau ’14, managing editor (far right)

The Common, Amherst College’s literary magazine, was one of 55 organizations nationwide to receive a National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) literature grant in 2014, the first year that the publication was eligible. The magazine received $10,000 “to support the creation of art that meets the highest standards of excellence.”

Theater & Dance Spring Season Kicks Off with Original Musical by Pepper Dee ’15

Submitted on Tuesday, 2/3/2015, at 3:36 PM


In February, March and April, four Amherst seniors—Pepper Dee, Valerie Rodriguez, Daejione Jones and Bryce Monroe—are bringing four distinctively original productions to the stage as part of their final projects in theater and dance.

Amherst Drives Conversation on Improvisation and Interdisciplinarity in the Liberal Arts

Submitted on Wednesday, 12/10/2014, at 2:00 PM

Faculty Workshop


“Improvisation, Interdisciplinarity and the Liberal Arts,” a three-day faculty workshop at Amherst, brought together professors and researchers from leading liberal arts institutions across the country with the goal of building collaborative networks among faculty whose research and teaching explore the burgeoning field of improvisation studies.

Organized primarily by Jason Robinson, assistant professor of music at Amherst, and sponsored by the Alliance to Advance Liberal Arts Colleges, the workshop hosted scholars from Amherst, Barnard, Hampshire, Oberlin, Pomona, Reed, Smith, Swarthmore and Wellesley Colleges; Columbia, Denison, Furman, Harvard and Wesleyan Universities; and the University of Guelph in Ontario. The attendees’ departmental affiliations ranged from art, theater, dance and music, to biology, comparative literature, American studies and computer science.

Professor’s Class Trains Students in “The Art of Beholding”

November 24, 2014

By Madeline Ruoff ’18

UptonCropped2_400x267.jpg

Art Professor Joel Upton

Among the hundreds of unusual offerings that fill the Amherst course catalog — classes that focus on food, on monsters, on murder — Professor of Art and the History of Art Joel Upton’s seminar “The Art of Beholding” stands out. In this class, students are not swamped in readings or essays or problem sets; in fact, the course syllabus is not even a full page.

New Black-Box Studio Space Creates Exciting Opportunities for Students Studying Film

Submitted on Monday, 12/8/2014, at 10:00 AM

By William Harvey ’18

Black Box
See a Flickr set of photos of the students using the new black-box studio.

A newly constructed “black-box” studio in Fayerweather Hall is specially equipped to provide students with hands-on experience in directing, filming and performing. 

Student Ensemble Takes on Rarely Produced Shakespeare Drama

Submitted on Thursday, 11/20/2014, at 4:45 PM

Cymbeline

See a Flickr set of more photos from Cymbeline.

Three nights in a row in Amherst's Holden Experimental Theater, the Department of Theater and Dance presented Shakespeare's rarely produced play Cymbeline. Written around 1610, Cymbeline is a tale of royal intrigue, strange coincidences, romantic betrayal, war and divine guidance. (Hollywood has recently taken notice of the story: it's coming to a theater near you in 2015, as a major motion picture starring Ethan Hawke and Ed Harris).

Ron Bashford, a professional director of Shakespeare and a faculty member at Amherst, knew Morgan Ashly Brown '15 was looking for a challenging acting role for her senior project in theater and dance. He suggested the complex part-tragedy part-comedy Cymbeline, and Brown took on the leading role of Imogen, an exiled princess whose harrowing journey uncovers the secret to renewed peace and harmony. Bashford directed the Holden Theater production, which featured a large cast of student actors in contemporary dress.

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