Dr. Charles R. Drew Portrayed in Mural

Submitted on Wednesday, 12/11/2013, at 1:45 PM

Dr. Charles R. Drew '26 is among a group of African-American achievers with ties to Massachusetts portrayed in a permanent art exhibition unveiled at the Edward L. Cooper Community Garden and Education Center in Roxbury, Mass. Drew was an outstanding surgeon who discovered the chemical method for preserving blood, and later became the director of the first American Blood Bank. He died in 1950. A residence hall at Amherst College, the Charles Drew Memorial Culture House, is named in his honor.

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The Mead's Mummy Mystery

Submitted on Wednesday, 10/30/2013, at 10:15 AM

by William Sweet

The Mead’s mummy is missing.

Truth be told, the 2,600-year-old mummy case has likely been empty for the entire half-century that it’s been with the Mead Art Museum. But records show that it once contained a preserved human body. This leaves museum staff with a mystery worth unraveling even as they prepare an ancient artifact for exhibit.

As with any good mystery, the more one learns about the Mead’s mummy case, the more questions arise.

Two Exhibitions Mark President Kennedy's Visit to Amherst 50 Years Ago

By Peter Rooney

The photos are atmospheric, historic and dramatic, some in color, some in black and white, capturing the historic day on Oct. 26, 1963, when President John F. Kennedy visited Amherst College to receive an honorary degree and preside over the groundbreaking for the Robert Frost Library.

The Poet and the Puppeteer

Submitted on Thursday, 8/22/2013, at 10:55 AM

Article by Katherine Duke ’05

Photos by Michael Bauman

On a warm July evening, on the grassy lawn of the Wilder Observatory, six actors and a musician from the Mettawee River Theatre Company gathered in front of an audience of all ages and used puppets and poetry to bring a medieval Welsh tale to life. Taliesin—which blends mythology and real historical figures—tells of a boy magically reborn as a sorcerer-poet and adopted by a fisherman and his wife, who uses his extraordinary gifts to shake things up in the king’s court. The performance was the result of a joint effort between two theater professionals who first collaborated at Amherst College more than 55 years ago.

Permanent Adoptions

By Emily Gold Boutilier

When the Mead Art Museum chooses to acquire a new work of art, it takes the long view. “We look at a 500-year window,” says Director Elizabeth E. Barker. “We’ll have it forever. It’s like a permanent adoption.”

Given the serious commitment involved, curators at the Mead take no acquisition lightly. They consider quality, condition and importance, as well as how a particular work relates to the other items in the museum, Barker says.

Ilan Stavans Pens Lyrics for Immigration-Themed “Tres Colores” Choir Concert at Amherst College

April 12, 2013

AMHERST, Mass. — Ilan Stavans, the Lewis-Sebring Professor of Latin American and Latino Culture at Amherst College, has chronicled aspects of his own immigrant experience from Mexico City to the United States in memoirs, poetry, books and graphic novels.

For the last several months, he’s been collaborating with a children’s chorus, renowned composers and the Amherst College Concert Choir to add music to his creative repertoire, while bringing talented children and college students together to address the theme that’s consumed much of his creative energy.

The end result will appear onstage in Buckley Recital Hall at 7:30 p.m. on Friday, April 12, when the college and the Lewis-Sebring Family Foundation sponsor the world premiere of Tres Colores,a musical journey of immigration and hope in America. The event is free and open to the public.

Let’s Hear It for Soundfest

Submitted on Sunday, 3/3/2013, at 12:25 PM

Article by Katherine Duke '05

Photos by Cole Morgan '13 and Rob Mattson

The sunny afternoon of Sat., March 30, certainly looked and felt like spring—and sounded like it, too. But I was on campus to immerse myself in the more unusual auditory stimuli of Soundfest, a featured event of the 2012–13 Copeland Colloquium: “Art in Place / the Place of Art.”