Mead Director Discusses Mellon Endowment Grant

Submitted on Wednesday, 4/25/2012, at 10:50 AM

The Daily Hampshire Gazette  spoke with Elizabeth Barker, director of the Mead Art Museum, about news that the museum is receiving a $1,000,000 Endowment Challenge Grant from Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. This grant will allow Amherst to endow its Coordinator of College Programs position, which is dedicated to best integrating the college's art collection with curriculum.

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Artist-in-Residence Wendy Ewald Wins Guggenheim Fellowship

Submitted on Thursday, 4/12/2012, at 12:19 PM

Wendy Ewald, visiting artist-in-residence at Amherst College, has won a John Simon Guggenheim Fellowship, adding to her long list of previous honors, which include a MacArthur Fellowship and grants from the National Endowment for the Arts, The Andy Warhol Foundation and the Fulbright Commission.

Ewald has taught the class “Collaborative Art: The Practice and Theory of Working with Communities” at Amherst since 2005 and has brought in well-known collaborative artists to create art with Five College students and the Amherst community.

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Resident Artist David Gloman Featured on Heisman Telecast

Submitted on Friday, 12/2/2011, at 2:00 PM

By Rob Mattson

Football and painting seem to have as much in common as Nietzsche and NASCAR, but David Gloman can attest otherwise. The 19-year veteran of Amherst College, a resident artist in the Department of Art and the History of Art, was hired to create drawings of 30 of today’s best football players as part of the ESPN production of the 77th Heisman Memorial Trophy Presentation. On Dec. 10, Baylor University player Robert Griffin III became the 32nd quarterback to earn college football’s most coveted trophy, but the opportunity to be part of such an iconic event was a victory for Gloman as well, like a swollen river that finally crested, but only after years of ebbing, flowing, meandering and shaping the landscape of his life.

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Professor Lawrence Douglas Publishes Two New Works of Fiction

Submitted on Wednesday, 8/17/2011, at 4:25 PM

Interview by Katherine Duke '05

In Chapter Five of The Girl with the Sturgeon TattooSwedish author Lars Arffssen’s new thriller about an investigation into serial reindeer killings and the secret history of the UKEA furniture company—protagonist Mikael Blomberg sneaks into the vast but messy apartment of the brilliant young hacker Lizzy Salamander and finds, on her nightstand, a copy of the novel The Vices, by Lawrence Douglas. “Must order it on Amazon,” he thinks.

Such conspicuous product placement is a treat for readers who are in on the joke: that Arffssen and Douglas are one and the same. Aug. 30 will mark the release of Sturgeon Tattoo, a parody of The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo and the other novels in Stieg Larsson’s bestselling crime thriller trilogy. The Vices, released on Aug. 16, is—like Douglas’s first novel, The Catastrophist—set partly at a fictional (but familiar) liberal arts college in Massachusetts.

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Cartoonist Behind Thor Donates Time and Talent to Alma Mater

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Simonson’s illustration for the Annual Fund

For almost 40 years, Walter “Walt” Simonson ’68 has been one of the artists and writers behind some of the most recognizable comic book heroes, from the Avengers and the Fantastic Four to Wonder Woman and Thor. This spring, Simonson generously donated his time and talent to his alma mater by creating an Amherst-themed superhero for the June Annual Fund appeal. At Amherst, Simonson studied geology, and his interest in the sciences is still evident in his signature, which resembles a distorted brontosaurus.

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Richard Wilbur: A Poet Turns 90

Students, professors honor Richard Wilbur at poetry reading

It was not a typical 90th birthday party, but Richard Wilbur ’42 is hardly a typical 90-year-old. A two-time Pulitzer Prize winner and former U.S. poet laureate, Wilbur holds the same teaching position at Amherst that Robert Frost once did. To celebrate his becoming a nonagenarian, a poetry reading seemed only fitting.

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"The Connection Between Sound and Place"

By Katherine Duke '05

Throughout her college years, Deidra Montgomery ’10 has been meeting up with other enthusiasts to raise her voice in a singing tradition called Sacred Harp. Now she’s conducting a formal study of her fellow singers. “I’m looking at who the Western Mass [Sacred Harp] community is, who makes it up and what a regular singing is like,” she says. Phil DuPont ’12 has been attending three Catholic Masses every week, at two different churches in Holyoke, Mass., listening to the differences in the songs and prayers at English- and Polish-language services. The singings and the churches are just a few examples of “Pioneer Valley Soundscapes.”

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A Poetic Homecoming

April 27, 2009

When a reader searches Richard Wilbur’s name on The New Yorker magazine’s Web site, an incredible 99 results mentioning the prolific poet and member of the college’s Class of 1942 appear. (To put that in context, look up “Robert Frost” and 56 links pop up, while “Emily Dickinson” generates 75.) The pieces themselves are quite impressive, not surprisingly: They include Wilbur’s poems, reviews of his books and translations and other miscellaneous references, such as an intriguing letter by Norman Mailer that cites in passing an invitation Jackie Kennedy made to said Amherst alumnus in the 1960s.