Amherst’s Theater and Dance Season Kicks off with Shakespeare, Reimagined

September 7, 2015
By Rachel Rogol

Photo by Scott Treadway

In the earliest years of the 17th century, Shakespeare wrote a little-known play called Pericles, Prince of Tyre. This Wednesday through Saturday, Sept. 9–12, Amherst’s Holden Experimental Theater transforms into Pericles’ world, complete with shipwrecks, assassins, pirates, romance and the heartbreaking story of a family torn apart.

Pericles, Prince of Tyre kicks off Amherst’s Theater and Dance 2015–16 season. Even if you’ve seen a production of Pericles before, chances are you haven’t seen it like this.

Student Ensemble Takes on Rarely Produced Shakespeare Drama

Submitted on Thursday, 11/20/2014, at 4:45 PM


See a Flickr set of more photos from Cymbeline.

Three nights in a row in Amherst's Holden Experimental Theater, the Department of Theater and Dance presented Shakespeare's rarely produced play Cymbeline. Written around 1610, Cymbeline is a tale of royal intrigue, strange coincidences, romantic betrayal, war and divine guidance. (Hollywood has recently taken notice of the story: it's coming to a theater near you in 2015, as a major motion picture starring Ethan Hawke and Ed Harris).

Ron Bashford, a professional director of Shakespeare and a faculty member at Amherst, knew Morgan Ashly Brown '15 was looking for a challenging acting role for her senior project in theater and dance. He suggested the complex part-tragedy part-comedy Cymbeline, and Brown took on the leading role of Imogen, an exiled princess whose harrowing journey uncovers the secret to renewed peace and harmony. Bashford directed the Holden Theater production, which featured a large cast of student actors in contemporary dress.

Digitizing Dickinson (and Shakespeare)

In keeping with Amherst’s motto, Terras Irradient, the new Amherst College Press is part of a broader effort at the college to make in­formation more widely available online.

The Folger Shakespeare Library (which is administered under the auspices of Amherst) has just released—online and for free—“meticulously edited” versions of the 12 most popular Shakespeare plays. Folger Director Michael Witmore believes the texts will become “the electronic edition of record for Shakespeare’s plays.” More digitized plays and poems are forthcoming.

ENGL 338, Shakespeare, Fall 2011

Submitted by Peter Berek on Tuesday, 9/20/2011, at 9:41 PM

The Great First Folio Caper


William Shakespeare

Peak Performances

By Katherine Duke '05

Amherst’s Spring 2010 season of performances is in full swing. In just the past three weeks, I’ve had the pleasure of sitting in the audience for five very different shows.