At Long Last, a Latino Literature Anthology Debuts

September 9, 2010

At least thirteen years in the making, and covering more than 400 years of writings by 201 writers, The Norton Anthology of Latino Literature, set for release on Sept. 13, is being hailed as a powerful contribution to American literary culture by authorities such as Harvard scholar Henry Louis Gates Jr. and author Barbara Kingsolver.

Physics Professor Pioneers New Method to Image Vortices in Ultracold Gases

September 3, 2010

Physics professor David Hall and his group of undergraduate researchers have invented a new technique for examining the behavior of rotating matter at the coldest temperatures in the universe.

The method—which involves an apparatus that refrigerates atoms to billionths of a degree above absolute zero—enabled them to create the first-ever movies of vortex motion in individual Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs). And they developed the technique in Hall’s very own campus laboratory.

Disease Likely Not a Common Cause of Species Extinction, New Amherst Study Finds

August 25, 2010

Challenging the widespread belief that rare and endangered plants and animals are unhealthy, a new study has found they in fact harbor a lower number and diversity of disease-causing parasites than non-threatened, close relatives of the same family, according to Amherst College biology professor Michael Hood and his research team.

Historian’s new biography profiles a “Model Nazi”

August 11, 2010

Model Nazi, a new biography about Arthur Greiser and his cruel oversight of western Poland between 1939 and 1945, sheds light on a relatively unknown yet influential figure in Nazi Germany–the man who initiated the first mass gassing of Jews in Nazi-occupied Europe.

The book’s author, Amherst College history professor Catherine Epstein, says Greiser’s upbringing and personality has parallels to other individuals who ended up playing key roles in genocides throughout history.