Amherst Drives Conversation on Improvisation and Interdisciplinarity in the Liberal Arts

Submitted on Wednesday, 12/10/2014, at 2:00 PM

Faculty Workshop


“Improvisation, Interdisciplinarity and the Liberal Arts,” a three-day faculty workshop at Amherst, brought together professors and researchers from leading liberal arts institutions across the country with the goal of building collaborative networks among faculty whose research and teaching explore the burgeoning field of improvisation studies.

Organized primarily by Jason Robinson, assistant professor of music at Amherst, and sponsored by the Alliance to Advance Liberal Arts Colleges, the workshop hosted scholars from Amherst, Barnard, Hampshire, Oberlin, Pomona, Reed, Smith, Swarthmore and Wellesley Colleges; Columbia, Denison, Furman, Harvard and Wesleyan Universities; and the University of Guelph in Ontario. The attendees’ departmental affiliations ranged from art, theater, dance and music, to biology, comparative literature, American studies and computer science.

What's on His Playlist

Assistant Professor of Music Jason Robinson, a saxophonist with three new releases in 2010, writes about the music he’s been listening to lately:

Eight Players to Watch

By Ben Kaplan '09

The 2007-08 winter season ended with two NESCAC titles, one national quarterfinal appearance, a pair of national runner-up finishes and 10 individual national championships. With the new winter season just getting underway, we now present eight athletes—four sophomores and four seniors—whom we expect to have breakout years.

Wednesday Night Shakespeare

Submitted by Katherine D. Duke

A Wednesday eve to Webster did we come—
Ten students, a professor and myself—
To gather ‘round a table laid with tea
And carrot cake. What play was it this week?
They’d done MacBeth, and Romeo they chose
For Valentine’s. So which tonight? Pray tell!
The cake displayed our title in sweet script:

The Merry Wives of Windsor. Comedy!
(It’s one I’ve never read, and, so we learn,
The only one that Shakespeare ever set
In modern England—his own time and place.)