Alumnus Returns for Powerful Performance Highlighting the Realities of Racism in America

September 21, 2015

The Lower Frequencies

Racial injustice. Social inequality. Black stereotypes. White privilege. These and other issues are at the heart of The Lower Frequencies, an original play written and performed by Amherst graduate Bryce Monroe '15 that is as captivating as its subject matter is difficult.

The show debuted at Amherst in April 2015, riveting students with its powerful and timely commentary on what it means to be a black man in America, and is back by popular demand for three nights only, Thursday, Sept. 24–Saturday, Sept. 26, at 7:30 p.m. in The Powerhouse.

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The Poet and the Puppeteer

Submitted on Thursday, 8/22/2013, at 10:55 AM

Article by Katherine Duke ’05

Photos by Michael Bauman

On a warm July evening, on the grassy lawn of the Wilder Observatory, six actors and a musician from the Mettawee River Theatre Company gathered in front of an audience of all ages and used puppets and poetry to bring a medieval Welsh tale to life. Taliesin—which blends mythology and real historical figures—tells of a boy magically reborn as a sorcerer-poet and adopted by a fisherman and his wife, who uses his extraordinary gifts to shake things up in the king’s court. The performance was the result of a joint effort between two theater professionals who first collaborated at Amherst College more than 55 years ago.

Eurydice

The theater and dance department staged a fall production of Eurydice, a play that reimagines the myth of Orpheus from the perspective of his wife, Eurydice. The playwright, Sarah Ruhl (daughter of the late Patrick Ruhl ’63), was a 2008 Robert Frost Fellow at the Amherst College Library. She came to campus in the last week of rehearsals to work on the production. Lisa Smith ’09 ( below right, holding an umbrella) played Eurydice.

Seattle Post-Intelligencer: Playwright Congdon has so much to say she almost forgets to promote the play

Submitted by Caroline J. Hanna
Amherst's playwright-in-residence Constance Congdon was interviewed for this light-hearted article in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer. In the story, she discusses everything from her new play to politics to her granddaughter.