Alumnus Returns for Powerful Performance Highlighting the Realities of Racism in America

September 21, 2015

The Lower Frequencies

Racial injustice. Social inequality. Black stereotypes. White privilege. These and other issues are at the heart of The Lower Frequencies, an original play written and performed by Amherst graduate Bryce Monroe '15 that is as captivating as its subject matter is difficult.

The show debuted at Amherst in April 2015, riveting students with its powerful and timely commentary on what it means to be a black man in America, and is back by popular demand for three nights only, Thursday, Sept. 24–Saturday, Sept. 26, at 7:30 p.m. in The Powerhouse.

Top 15 Amherst College News Stories of 2014–15

Now that the academic year is done, let's take a look back at some of the most clicked, tweeted, liked and shared bits of Amherst-related news. Here, in chronological order, are the year's highlights:

1. Meet the Class of 2018, by the Numbers
Amherst's class of 2018 includes an internationally ranked table tennis player, a Morse Code enthusiast, a U.S. military veteran, a blacksmith and someone who wears size 16 shoes.

Testing Prejudice

Interview by Peter Rooney

In 2008, Professor of Psychology Elizabeth Aries published Race and Class Matters at an Elite College, about 58 white and black students, half of them affluent, half of them lower-income, during their first year at Amherst. Her new book, Speaking of Race and Class: The Student Experience at an Elite College, written with Richard Berman, reconnects with 55 of these students in their senior year.

Professor’s new book explores race and class at Amherst College

Submitted on Sunday, 10/14/2012, at 10:00 PM

With a student body that’s close to 50 percent non-white, and with more than 60 percent of its students receiving financial aid, Amherst College is an ideal environment to explore whether  people of different races and economic backgrounds—who live, study and socialize together—will learn about each other and therefore become less prejudiced over time.