Black Studies and History Professor’s Book Wins Prize

November 19, 2010

Schooling Citizens: The Struggle for African American Education in Antebellum America, by Hilary Moss, assistant professor of black studies and history, has been honored with the History of Education Society’s (HES) 2010 award for the year’s most outstanding book on the history of education.

The HES Book Prize Committee annually solicits nominations for the award, and this year, 22 publications were nominated. The group first narrowed their choice to five finalists and then reread these volumes carefully, evaluating each book’s thesis and supporting arguments, the work’s significance to the field, its use of sources and its aesthetic qualities. Schooling Citizens came out on top because the committee believed it to be “an important contribution to the historiography of American education, focusing as it does on the purpose of public education,” said HES Book Prize Committee Chair Amy Thompson McCandless, professor of history and dean of the Graduate School at the College of Charleston, in an announcement about the prize. “Well-argued and well written, it deals with issues of race, class, ethnicity, religion and gender that continue to confront educators from pre-school to post-doctoral levels in the 21st century.”