All publications

  • John Moore's 'Pastoral Letters': Part of the story of how and why some of the 'Great Books' were taught at Amherst College during the era of the New Curriculum by Richard F. Teichgraeber III '71. Booklet designed by Ronald Gordon at the Oliphant Press and printed by GHP Media. 2012.
  • From Poetry to Playwriting by Sarah Ruhl. Booklet designed by Ronald Gordon at the Oliphant Press and printed by Thames Printing Company. 2009.

Archival & Primary Sources

Five College Archives and Special Collections

Five College Archives and Manuscript Collections (5CAM) Searchable database of archival and manuscript holdings in Five College repositories.
Amherst College Archives and Special Collections
Hampshire College Archives

Dickinson in The Norton Anthology of Poetry

Emily Dickinson poems in The Norton Anthology of Poetry (5th ed.) for which Amherst College holds manuscripts.

Digitizing Dickinson (and Shakespeare)

In keeping with Amherst’s motto, Terras Irradient, the new Amherst College Press is part of a broader effort at the college to make in­formation more widely available online.

The Folger Shakespeare Library (which is administered under the auspices of Amherst) has just released—online and for free—“meticulously edited” versions of the 12 most popular Shakespeare plays. Folger Director Michael Witmore believes the texts will become “the electronic edition of record for Shakespeare’s plays.” More digitized plays and poems are forthcoming.

The Clue Is in Emily's Eyes

By William Sweet

Imagine having the whole world judge you on a single snapshot—one taken when you were 16.
It sounds like the beginning of some cringe-inducing Facebook horror story, but in this case it’s the story of the enigmatic Emily Dickinson.

A New Face for the Belle of Amherst?

Submitted on Thursday, 9/13/2012, at 3:42 PM

by William Sweet

Imagine having the whole world judge you on a single snapshot—one taken when you were 16.

Visit the Emily Dickinson Museum

Dwell in Possibility: Big Ideas on Little Houses

Submitted on Wednesday, 5/9/2012, at 9:33 AM

At first glance, it looks like a tiny housing development has cropped up in the environs of the Emily Dickinson Museum. The 40 little white houses are like the words of the poet herself: carefully prepared, diligently arranged and deceptively spare. There aren’t any tiny people living here, though—just big ideas.

A Cannon for the Confederacy: The Legacy of Frazar Stearns

Submitted on Thursday, 3/15/2012, at 3:28 PM

By William Sweet

A century and a half ago, a member of the Amherst College Class of 1863 followed his chemistry professor into this country’s bloodiest conflict and returned in a coffin. After the body of Frazar Stearns—the son of the college’s fourth president, William Augustus Stearns—came back to Amherst, so did a cannon that he had helped reclaim from Confederate forces. It was a pale substitute for a 21-year-old with a promising future, but the “Amherst Cannon” would become a boon for historians.

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