Dwell in Possibility: Big Ideas on Little Houses

Submitted on Wednesday, 5/9/2012, at 9:33 AM

At first glance, it looks like a tiny housing development has cropped up in the environs of the Emily Dickinson Museum. The 40 little white houses are like the words of the poet herself: carefully prepared, diligently arranged and deceptively spare. There aren’t any tiny people living here, though—just big ideas.

A Cannon for the Confederacy: The Legacy of Frazar Stearns

Submitted on Thursday, 3/15/2012, at 3:28 PM

By William Sweet

A century and a half ago, a member of the Amherst College Class of 1863 followed his chemistry professor into this country’s bloodiest conflict and returned in a coffin. After the body of Frazar Stearns—the son of the college’s fourth president, William Augustus Stearns—came back to Amherst, so did a cannon that he had helped reclaim from Confederate forces. It was a pale substitute for a 21-year-old with a promising future, but the “Amherst Cannon” would become a boon for historians.

Belle of Amherst or Bride of Salem?

Susan Snively, poet and director emeritus of the Writing Center at Amherst College and currently a guide at the Emily Dickinson Museum, gave a presentation at the Salem Athenaeum on the poet’s private life, as glimpsed in fragments of letters between the “Belle of Amherst” and Otis Phillips Lord, a justice of the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court from Salem.

The Dickinson Daguerreotype

Riddle of Emily Dickinson

Rebecca Patterson. The Riddle of Emily Dickinson, 1951.