Meditations on War and Circumstance

By Jacob Worrell ’12E

It was raining. People are often surprised to hear that it rains in Iraq. When people imagine the daily discomforts of soldiers deployed in Iraq, they think about facing imminent death, frying in the desert sun and the dull monotony of daily routine. Anything but rain. But in northern Iraq in 2005, for roughly three months between mid-December and March, it seemed to rain every other day—not refreshing summer drizzles either, but ice-cold buckets.

Former United Nations Ambassador John R. Bolton, “Dealing with Rogue States After Iraq”

John Bolton
Former United Nations Ambassador John R. Bolton speaks at Amherst College on Monday, Dec. 3, 2007.

Kenneth Roth, “Why the Current Approach to Fighting Terrorism is Making Us Less Safe”

Andrew J. Bacevich, "U.S. Options in Iraq"

On Thursday, Oct. 4, at 8 p.m. in Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall, AndrewJ. Bacevich, professor of international relations at Boston University, spoke on the current situation in Iraq and the current policies available to the United States to contain our generation's greatest geopolitical crisis. His topics included the Bush administration's "surge," legislation in Congress for a timetable of withdrawal and the partition of Iraq into semi-autonomous Shiite, Sunni and Kurdish states.

Reports From Iraq Under Sanctions Feb. 21

February 14, 2001Director of Media Relations413/542-8417 AMHERST, MA—Lauren Cannon and Tom Jackson will bring “Reports from Basra 2000: Living under Sanctions” on Wednesday, Feb. 21, at 7 p.m. in the Campus Center Theater at Amherst College. Their firsthand report of the effects of sanctions on the people of Iraq is free and open to the public.

The New York Times: Rieckhoff '98 Says Iraq is an Invisible War

Submitted by Paul S. Statt
An Invisible War The New York Times, May 3 " Paul Rieckhoff looked across the crowded restaurant, which was not far from Times Square. “During World War II,” he said, “we could be in this place and there would be a guy sitting at that table who was in the war, or the bartender had been in the war. Everybody you saw would have had a stake in the war. But right now you could walk around New York for blocks and not find anybody who has been in Iraq.