Boys’ Night Out

Boys’ Night Out featured Roger Williams ’56 on guitar, Mike Ritter ’56 on bass and Fred Nelson on mandolin/guitar. The performance was a delightful mixture of bluegrass, folk and “old-timey” music. They even worked in a few Irish songs and sea shanties, and included some catchy fiddle tunes to get toes tapping.

Presented by the Class of 1956.

The Art and Politics of Science

Science is an art that challenges the imagination of individuals attempting to understand the natural world, but it is also a community effort that reaches consensus and acts politically to seek funds, promote exchanges of information and materials and develop complex research programs. Dr. Harold Varmus ’61 discussed these aspects of scientific life based on his experience as a cancer researcher, an institutional leader and an “open access” publisher of scientific work.

Presented  by the Class of 1961.

Re-Inventing Tokyo: Japan’s Largest City in the Artistic Imagination

Tokyo is the political, cultural and economic center of Japan, the largest urban hub on the planet, holding 35 million people, fully one-fifth of Japan's population. The city has continually reinvented itself since its founding over 400 years ago, when a small fishing village became Edo, the castle headquarters of the Tokugawa shoguns.  Samuel C.

Hamdan vs. Rumsfield: Fighting Military Tribunals and Other Government Intrusion

Steve Vladeck ’01, professor of law at American University Washington College of Law, was part of the legal team that successfully challenged the Bush Administration's use of military tribunals at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, in Hamdan vs. Rumsfield, 548 U.S. 557 (2006). In addition, he has coauthored amicus briefs in a host of other lawsuits challenging the U.S. government's surveillance and detention of terrorism suspects. Steve discusses his work on Hamdan as well as the current detainee litigation and the ongoing debate over military commissions and indefinite detention.

A Tale of Two Cities: The Christchurch, NZ and Sendai, Japan Earthquakes and Their Collateral Damage

Tekla Harms, professor of geology, reviews the causes and consequences of this year’s two devastating earthquakes, and the scope, benefits, and costs of earthquake preparedness. Can enough ever be enough?

An Amherst Conversation and Annual Meeting of the Society of the Alumni and the Alumni Council

Conversation with President Anthony W. Marx and Annual Meeting of the Society of the Alumni and the Alumni Council

As part of the Annual Meeting,  Distinguished Service Awards will be presented and  names of the recently elected alumni trustees and committee members and officers of the Society of the Alumni will be announced.

Being Gay at Amherst: Voices Through Time

Louis Dolbeare ’40; Folger Cleaveland ’67; Steve Cadwell ’72; Larry Axelrod ’81; Jasmine Eucogco '06 and others reflect on what being a student who did not identify with the heterosexual norm was like when they were students at Amherst. 

This program is part of the 25th Anniversary of the Gay and Lesbian Alumni (GALA) Celebration.


Listen to the audio 

Noah's Ark: Judith Frank Reads from Her Novel In Progress


Noah’s Ark centers upon a gay couple who become the guardians of two small children when one’s brother and sister-in-law, who live in Jerusalem, are killed in a café bombing.


Submitted by Carol A. Allman-Morton on Monday, 5/9/2011, at 4:47 PM