In the Lab

Studying Slime Mold Yields Insight into Cellular Behavior

August 19, 2010

It may sound like something out of a Far Side cartoon, but it’s serious science. Amherst College biology professor David Ratner and several of his students have spent this summer examining how Dictyostelium discoideum—a cellular slime mold—behaves. The bigger goal is to explore the research frontiers of gene expression and protein degradation. It all adds up to an intense summer research experience for students and professor alike, as well as insights into how the degradation of proteins influences the division of all cells, whether normal and healthy or mutated and malfunctioning.

In this video, Ratner, along with students Benjamin Garmezy ’11 and Elizabeth “Molly” Scott ’13, discuss their research, the altruistic qualities of the slime mold and the considerable advantages of studying science at a liberal arts college such as Amherst.

Work in Progress

Nature Episode to Feature Professor Ethan Temeles’ Hummingbird Research

December 22, 2009Ethan Temeles

Tiny birds will be the big stars of an episode of Nature airing Jan. 10 on PBS. The episode will feature the hummingbird research of Ethan J. Temeles, professor of biology at Amherst College.

The show, titled “Hummingbirds: Magic in the Air,” will feature Temeles’ research on the purple-throated carib hummingbird on the island nation of Dominica. The film is spectacular for its high-speed cinematography: viewers can literally see hummingbirds trying to kick each other as they squabble over food and get birds’-eye views of them feeding from flowers.

Impacts of Climate Change on Invasive Plants in the Western US: Opportunities for Restoration?

Bethany Bradley, Copeland Fellow, Department of Biology, Amherst College
November 2, 2009

Risk, Return on Investment, and Incentives: Why Environmental Conservation Needs High Finance

C. Josh Donlan, Copeland Fellow, Department of Biology, Amherst College
October 26, 2009

Work in Progress

By Emily Gold Boutilier

The Missing Piece

hummingbird

Flowers have evolved to fit the bills of female (above) and male (below) hummingbirds—and the birds have evolved to fit the flowers.

By Sarah Auerbach '96

 

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