Student Honors Research

Amherst's Biology Department has a long tradition of active research by its faculty and participation of senior majors and other students in this research. Biology majors who enter the Honors Program devote about half of their academic effort during the senior year to research, and the resulting thesis is often the basis of their first scientific publication.

Student Honors Research: 2010 - 2014

Amherst's Biology Department has a long tradition of active research by its faculty and participation of senior majors and other students in this research. Biology majors who enter the Honors Program devote about half of their academic effort during the senior year to research, and the resulting thesis is often the basis of their first scientific publication.

Student Honors Research: 2000 - 2004

mherst's Biology Department has a long tradition of active research by its faculty and participation of senior majors and other students in this research. Biology majors who enter the Honors Program devote about half of their academic effort during the senior year to research, and the resulting thesis is often the basis of their first scientific publication.

Student Honors Research: 2005 - 2009

Amherst's Biology Department has a long tradition of active research by its faculty and participation of senior majors and other students in this research. Biology majors who enter the Honors Program devote about half of their academic effort during the senior year to research, and the resulting thesis is often the basis of their first scientific publication.

Professor David Hanneke Wins NSF CAREER Grant for Physics Research with Amherst College Students

Submitted on Monday, 7/1/2013, at 4:58 PM

By Katherine Duke ’05

The research that takes place in David Hanneke’s lab in Merrill Science Center involves a lot of cool stuff: lasers, crystals, electromagnetic traps, the fundamental constants of the universe and Amherst College students. Now Hanneke, an assistant professor of physics, has a five-year, $600,000 CAREER grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to support his team’s ongoing investigations into the properties of charged particles.  

When the Mental is Physical

By Jenny Morgan

[Research] Stress is everywhere.

And while it doesn’t take a scientist to notice it, scientists across disciplines are asking questions about what all this stress might mean for our health. At Amherst, students in the course “Biochemical Principles of Life at the Molecular Level” have brought their own questions to bear on the relationship between human health and stress.

Look Before You Text: Leah Thompson ’15 Studies Distraction

Janurary 18, 2013 • By William Sweet

“Look both ways before crossing the street.”

It’s a lesson that most of us learn by the age of 6. But according to Leah Thompson ’15, who spent this past summer studying pedestrian behavior, it’s also a lesson that many adults have managed to unlearn or ignore.

The culprit, in many cases, is the smartphone.