Don't Be Cruel

"The Psychology of Good & Evil"

Submitted on Monday, 11/19/2012, at 11:46 AM

By Katherine Duke ’05

Last year, a 2-year-old in Foshan, China, wandered into the road, where vehicles repeatedly struck her, and for a full 10 minutes thereafter, not one of the many passersby stopped to help the child; she died of her injuries a week later. In Guyana in 1978, hundreds of members of the “Jonestown Cult” fatally poisoned themselves and their children at the urging of leader Jim Jones. In the 1930s and 1940s, more than 23,000 non-Jews in at least 45 countries risked their lives to aid, hide and protect Jewish people, even as the Nazis were committing systematic mass murder.

Catherine Sanderson

Catherine Sanderson, professor of psychology at Amherst College, also serves as a member of the town school committee, manages to find time to teach, conduct research, write books as well as advise members of the men’s hockey team. She’s also advised several football players over the years on academics, including Quarterback Alex Vetras.

Slate.com: Self-Love, Actually

Psychology professor Catherine Sanderson discussed whether or not opposites really do attract in this article on the popular website.

CNN.com: Does romance end when summer does?

Psychology professor and relationship expert Catherine Sanderson commented on summer romances in this article for the news website. “People out of their regular environment find it easier to pursue romance or love [during vacation], especially late adolescents, because they don’t have classes or exams, as they would in their regular social world,” she explained.

Courier-Post: Catherine Sanderson on Eating Habits

Psychology professor Catherine Sanderson was quoted in three articles about weight loss appearing in the March 1, 8  and 15 editions of southern New Jersey’s Courier-Post newspaper.

Lives of Consequence

"They own it,” says Catherine Sanderson.

The Hindu: Money is important, but how much do you need?

In this piece about the money and happiness, psychology professor Catherine Sanderson offered some expert commentary. “We always think if we just had a little bit more money, we’d be happier,” she told the Indian newspaper, “but when we get there, we’re not.”

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