What They Are Reading

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Hilary Moss, assistant professor of history and black studies

What They Are Reading

Suzanne R. Coffey, director of athletics, writes about the books on the table between her favorite chair and the woodstove:

I am most often reading several books simultaneously. The more dog-eared and Post-it-note-marked, the better the read. On the table between my favorite chair and the woodstove, you’ll find Richard Russo’s That Old Cape Magic, Malcolm Gladwell’s What the Dog Saw and Other Adventures and The Cambridge Handbook of Expertise and Expert Performance.

What They Are Reading

Elizabeth Barker, director and chief curator of the Mead Art Museum, writes about the books on her bedside table:

LEARNING TO READ THEORY

Submitted by Jerome L. Himmelstein on Thursday, 9/17/2009, at 2:44 PM

What They Are Reading

Professor of Philosophy Alexander George writes about the books on his figurative bedside table:

Keeping potted portraits of others’ works or of my reactions to a minimum, here instead are selected quotations, from stuff recently read, that did something for me.

From W. H. Auden’s Selected Poems, but not selected by him and including some poems he loathed and was ashamed to have written, though not this from “Horae Canonicae”: “at this noon, on this hill / in the occasion of this dying.”

What They Are Reading

Paola Zamperini, assistant professor of Asian languages and civilizations, talks about the books on her figurative bedside table:

What They Are Reading

We asked Associate Professor of Religion Maria Heim what she read over the summer. Here’s what she told us:

My summer reading list was shorter than I would have liked—isn’t it always?—and often I am grateful just to grab enough time to glance over the newspaper, but I did manage to get in a few fun things.

What They Are Reading

We asked Geoffrey Woglom, the Richard S. Volpert ’56 Professor of Economics, what he has been reading lately. Here’s what he told us:

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