Apocalypse

Submitted by Rachel K. Brickman on Wednesday, 10/12/2011, at 10:43 AM

According to Cesaire, in order to sculpt a Caribbean culture all their own, the colonized people, once free, must erase all remnants of the French colonizers from their lives. He feels that any remaining aspect of the oppressors will act as a foundation upon which a supposedly ‘new’ culture will form. Although the annihilation of all life from an erupted volcano can be extreme, the lush regeneration is undeniably worth the damage. Had Cesaire and John Locke ever crossed paths, they would undoubtedly find a commonality in their adoration for the idea of tabula rasa.

Nature

Submitted by Rachel K. Brickman on Wednesday, 10/12/2011, at 10:43 AM

There is a constant suggested (or sometimes blatantly stated) connection between the Caribbean landscape and the colonized peoples inhabiting it. The European dualism of ‘white=rational; black=emotional’ complements the overwhelmed nature of the senses when in contact with the Caribbean beaches, fauna, and other ‘exotic’ motifs. Both Suzanne and Aime Cesaire discussed their opinions on how the black colonized person should view him or herself in the context of their native land.