Professor Catherine Ciepiela Publishes Anthology of Contemporary Russian Women Poets

Submitted on Tuesday, 2/18/2014, at 3:26 PM

when trees write                                                                                                     если деревья пишут,
it’s to the white flowers                                                                                           то белым цветам,
that walked the garden                                                                                           что ходили по саду. 

when birds do                                                                                                         если птицы,
it’s of what can’t be sung                                                                                       о том, чего спеть нельзя.

lumps do not speak,                                                                                              комья не говорят,
in flowerpots                                                                                                           по цветочным горшкам
they have buried silence.                                                                                      зарыли молчание.

 —Anna Glazova                                                                                                              —Анна Глазова

 

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Students Encounter Nature around Amherst

Submitted on Wednesday, 10/30/2013, at 9:47 AM

The Poet and the Puppeteer

Submitted on Thursday, 8/22/2013, at 10:55 AM

Article by Katherine Duke ’05

Photos by Michael Bauman

On a warm July evening, on the grassy lawn of the Wilder Observatory, six actors and a musician from the Mettawee River Theatre Company gathered in front of an audience of all ages and used puppets and poetry to bring a medieval Welsh tale to life. Taliesin—which blends mythology and real historical figures—tells of a boy magically reborn as a sorcerer-poet and adopted by a fisherman and his wife, who uses his extraordinary gifts to shake things up in the king’s court. The performance was the result of a joint effort between two theater professionals who first collaborated at Amherst College more than 55 years ago.

Buddhist Religious Advisor Mark D. Hart Publishes Poetry Book

Buddhist Religious Advisor Mark D. Hart has published his first book of poetry, Boy Singing to Cattle (Pearl, 2013). He will give a public reading, sponsored by Religious Life and the Department of English, on Thursday, March 28, at 7:30 p.m. in Pruyne Lecture Hall (Fayerweather 115).

“Now That We Are In It”

By Robert Bagg ’57

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Now 91, Wilbur is a John Woodruff Simpson Lecturer at Amherst.

Visit the Emily Dickinson Museum

Dwell in Possibility: Big Ideas on Little Houses

Submitted on Wednesday, 5/9/2012, at 9:33 AM

At first glance, it looks like a tiny housing development has cropped up in the environs of the Emily Dickinson Museum. The 40 little white houses are like the words of the poet herself: carefully prepared, diligently arranged and deceptively spare. There aren’t any tiny people living here, though—just big ideas.

Epic

Submitted by Rachel K. Brickman on Wednesday, 10/12/2011, at 10:38 AM

In general terms, an epic is a grandiose literary history of a people. This usually includes founding stories, battles, and etiologies. Although the components of these tales may seem absurd at the moment in which they are set and/or created, truly successful epics transcend eras and become accepted in times far removed from their inception points. Oftentimes, myths accompany epics as driving forces or scapegoats for the more extreme aspects of the stories. Epics that survive their inception describe ideologies that are bigger than the epics themselves.

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