Original Play by Professor Wendy Woodson Connects Imagery, Memory and More

October 13, 2015
By Rachel Rogol

Dora  

Ecology. Resistance fighters. A case study by Sigmund Freud. These are the underlying themes of Dora, an original performance about two people who meet and lose one another repeatedly against continually shifting landscapes of history and memory.

Written and performed by Wendy Woodson, Amherst's Roger C. Holden 1919 Professor of Theater and DanceDora simultaneously explores the relationship between its two characters and the many possible connections between images and human memory. "Dora is not a naturalistic or realistic play," Woodson says, "but rather a series of encounters."

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Senior Thesis Performance Highlights Racial Injustices

Bryce Monroe '15
Bryce Monroe '15 rehearses his senior thesis performance The Lower Frequecies.
See more photos on Flickr.

“This is me telling a story based on my experience as a young black man in America,” says Bryce Monroe '15 of his senior thesis performance in theater and dance. Titled The Lower Frequencies and inspired by Ralph Ellison’s 1952 novel Invisible Man, Monroe's one-man play aims to shed light on the realities of racism in America through a series of powerful, witty and tragic vignettes.

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March 30 — SOUNDFEST

They say that March is "in like a lion, out like a lamb". This year's Copeland Colloquium will bid farewell to this month of transition with a program of indoor and outdoor sound installation and performance, as lively and fierce and dynamic as a lion's roar (while we hope for lamb-like weather). We will feature work by Tim Eriksen, Wendy Woodson, Jake Meginsky, Eric Leonardson, Steph Robinson & Mark Santolucito. The event is free and open to the public.

Wendy Woodson Creates Video Installation for Australia’s Immigration Museum

Submitted on Friday, 1/6/2012, at 2:43 PM

Wendy Woodson, the Roger C. Holden 1919 Professor of Theater and Dance—in collaboration with designer Kathy Couch ’95 and sound designer Myles Mumford—has created a video installation titled Belonging: Reflections on Place, which will run in the Immigration Museum in Melbourne, Australia, until Jan. 22, 2012. The installation incorporates ambient music and street sounds, projected footage of movement and travel, and video interviews in which dozens of people from around the world reflect on their experiences as immigrants and refugees to Australia.