Words in Transit: The Cultures of Translation—2014-2015 Copeland Theme

Amherst Panel Conversation Raises Awareness about Contemporary Arabic Literature

The Common panel participants
Three of the six panelists (left to right): Michel S. Moushabeck, founder of Interlink Publishing; John Siciliano, executive editor at Penguin Random House; and Jennifer Acker '00, founder and editor-in-chief of The Common, Photo by Steven Tagle

Roughly 3 percent of books published in the U.S. every year are works in translation.

Of that 3 percent, only about 4.3 percent are translated from Arabic.

How often do you read books in English that have been translated from other languages? Chances are, not often. Have you ever read a book in English that was translated from Arabic? Chances are, you haven't. Statistically speaking, your chances of finding any work in translation—works from the Arab world in particular—on the shelves of your local bookstore are minimal.

Roughly 3 percent of books published in the U.S. every year are works in translation; of that 3 percent, only about 4.3 percent are translated from Arabic. This spring, Jennifer Acker '00, founder and editor-in-chief of Amherst's literary magazine The Common, moderated a panel conversation at Amherst about contemporary Arabic fiction and began by citing these bleak statistics (which come from publisher Chad Post, who provided them to Publishers Weekly for this article).

"Our hope," Acker explained, "is that all of our collective efforts as readers and writers, community members and publishers ... can help to increase that number."

Words in Transit: The Cultures of Translation

Copeland Colloquium 2014-2015

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Masters of Disaster: Studying Catastrophe with Douglas and Sarat

Submitted on Thursday, 3/28/2013, at 10:53 AM

by William Sweet

How are we all going to die? There are so many options, changing from week to week: killer tsunamis, mile-wide meteors, avian flu, earthquakes school shootings, and dirty bombs. If you need a little distraction from this gloom, maybe it’s time to take in a movie. The Poseidon Adventure? Armageddon? The Day After Tomorrow? Melancholia? Something with zombies?

Amherst College to Host Screening, Director’s Discussion of Mexican Film Revolución on April 28

April 25, 2011                                                                   

AMHERST, Mass.—On Thursday, April 28, at 4 p.m. in Stirn Auditorium, Amherst College will host a screening of the new Mexican film Revolución and panel discussion about it with two of the film’s directors, Mariana Chenillo and Amat Escalante, and Amherst faculty members Rick Lopez, associate professor of history, and Javier Corrales, professor of political science.

Immigration Politics: What Next After the Election?

The 2010-11 Copeland Program presents Daniel Altschuler ’04, Copeland Fellow; Carleen Basler, professor of American studies and sociology; Javier Corrales, professor of political science; and Ilan Stavans, Lewis-Sebring Professor in Latin American and Latino Culture (Spanish) discussing “Immigration Politics: What Next After the Election?”

Impacts of Climate Change on Invasive Plants in the Western US: Opportunities for Restoration?

Bethany Bradley, Copeland Fellow, Department of Biology, Amherst College
November 2, 2009

Risk, Return on Investment, and Incentives: Why Environmental Conservation Needs High Finance

C. Josh Donlan, Copeland Fellow, Department of Biology, Amherst College
October 26, 2009

Palestinian Poet and Author Suheir Hammad to Hold Reading at Amherst College March 3

Submitted by Emanuel Costache
February 20, 2008 Contact: Caroline Jenkins Hanna Director of Media Relations 413/542-8417

Filmmaker Jean-Marie Teno to Showcase His Work at Amherst College Dec. 3

Submitted by Holly R. Saltrelli
November 30, 2007 Contact: Caroline Jenkins Hanna Director of Media Relations 413/542-8417

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