The Point of Pointing

Submitted on Friday, 11/22/2013, at 4:42 PM

Article by Katherine Duke ’05

Photos by Rob Mattson

Human beings seem unique among species in our ability to communicate through words. But what about communication without words—through gestures? When a small child points a finger, or looks where someone else is pointing, in what sense is she engaged in “communication”? Is she using intellectual abilities that go beyond those of a dog or a chimpanzee? How can we tell?

Hooked

By Katherine Duke ’05

Photos courtesy of Kiyoshi Mino ’01 and Emma Lincoln ’02

[Fiber Arts] Kiyoshi Mino ’01 is constantly surrounded by animals. When not tending to the live ducks, chickens, bees, pigs, sheep and steers on the 10-acre farm that he founded with his wife, Emma Lincoln ’02, he’s sculpting birds and mammals out of wool through a technique called needle felting.

Queens of the Masai Mara

Submitted on Monday, 11/19/2012, at 11:46 AM

Acting Like Animals

Ethan Clotfelter, associate professor of biology and neuroscience and chair of the Department of Biology, answers questions about his course Biology 281: “Animal Behavior.” He taught the course last semester and will offer it again in Fall 2013.

Interview and photos by Rob Mattson

Earliest Fossils are of Sponge-Like Animals: New Research by Amherst College Geologist Whitey Hagadorn Featured in Science Magaz

October 13, 2006 Director of Media Relations413/542-8417