Charmingly Gruesome

Boy Meets Girl, Russell Style

Reviewed by Josh Bell ’02

[Film] Filmmaker David O. Russell found the biggest acclaim and success of his career by working as a director for hire on 2010’s boxing drama The Fighter, but before that he’d spent his
time focusing on oddball stories about abrasive but endearing outcasts, in movies such as Flirting with Disaster and I ❤ Huck­abees.

Just the Facts, Ma’am

By Emily Gold Boutilier

Angelina Gomez’s summer research was part of a larger effort by Associate Professor of Psychology Matthew Schulkind to study gender differences in memory.

"No, I Am Your Father"

Are men more likely than women to accurately recall movie lines? As part of a psychology professor’s research into this question, Angelina Gomez ’14 has scrutinized exactly 635 quotes that Amherst students think they know by heart.

No Self-Reflection Here

By William Sweet


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“Mr. Skinner, I’m not a journalist; I’m a poet. Let’s get into it.”

Sound, Silence, and Process at Amherst College

by Taylor Haney for PVS Trial Media Project, Spring 2012

A Comeback Story

The Fighter, directed by David O. Russell ’81E and starring Mark Wahlberg, Christian Bale and Amy Adams (Paramount Pictures)

Reviewed by Josh Bell ’02

The Best of Amherst on Film

References to the Fairest College in Animal House, Titanic and more

The recent Mad Men season included a character who went to Mount Holyoke. That  got us thinking about Amherst College references on TV and film. We asked our more than 1,000 Twitter followers to name their favorites. Here is a sampling of what they wrote: 

dybner: My favorite is “I’m Frank Lyman from Amherst” [Animal House]. Note that Frank Lyman’s name appears on the plaque under the Rte. 9 bridge.

Professor Christian Rogowski Publishes Book on Weimar Cinema

Rogowski

Professor of German Christian Rogowski is editor of the new book The Many Faces of Weimar Cinema: Rediscovering Germany’s Filmic Legacy (Boydell & Brewer). Published on June 15, 2010, the book presents up-to-date perspectives on German filmmaking from the years of the Weimar Republic (1919-1933).

Traditionally, Weimar cinema has been viewed reductively—equated with only a limited number of canonical films (for example, Robert Wiene’s The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari and F.W. Murnau’s Nosferatu), several auteurist filmmakers and the expressionist film style. But in recent decades, researchers have uncovered a wealth of source material that shows Weimar cinema to be richer and more diverse than typically thought. The new book’s 18 contributors, including Rogowski himself, highlight lesser-known directors and producers, popular genres, nonfiction film and experiments in the artistic avant-garde. “The essays collected in the volume seek to redress the neglect such genre films have suffered,” he says. “Few have survived; even fewer are available outside archives, with English subtitles, for an international audience.” The essays also discuss Weimar films in terms of broader issues such as gender and sexuality; national identity and transnational collaboration; filmmaking technologies, including the introduction of sound to films; and connections with other media and art forms.

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