Video: Mead exhibit and accompanying catalogue celebrate 20th-century American artist Josef Albers

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On view at the Mead Art Museum through Jan. 3, Intersecting Colors: Josef Albers and His Contemporaries celebrates the juncture of art and science in the work of 20th-century American artist, teacher and color practitioner Josef Albers. Watch the video to see footage from the exhibit and peek inside pages of the accompanying catalogue, available now from Amherst College Press.

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Top 15 Amherst College News Stories of 2014–15

Amherst
Now that the academic year is done, let's take a look back at some of the most clicked, tweeted, liked and shared bits of Amherst-related news. Here, in chronological order, are the year's highlights:

1. Meet the Class of 2018, by the Numbers
Amherst's class of 2018 includes an internationally ranked table tennis player, a Morse Code enthusiast, a U.S. military veteran, a blacksmith and someone who wears size 16 shoes.

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Finding Inspiration: Studio Art Majors Share the Stories Behind Works on View

May 4, 2015
By Rachel Rogol

Darrow and Brathwaite in the studio Darrow and Brathwaite in the art studio they share with Blackmore and Rothkopf in Fayerweather Hall

After a year spent sharing an art studio on the bottom floor of Fayerweather Hall, Natasha Blackmore, Shannon Brathwaite, María Darrow and Emma Rothkopf are slowly beginning to pack and clear the space for next year’s studio art seniors.

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Ready for the Year 3015? World’s Slowest Photograph Will Chart a Millennium’s Evolution

Jonathon Keats
Jonathon Keats '94

The Mead Art Museum is already planning an exhibition in the year 3015 that will unveil the world's slowest photograph, taken in a single exposure over the course of 1,000 years. 

The conceptual artist behind the project is Jonathon Keats '94, whose "millennium camera" will be installed atop Amherst's Stearns Steeple in June 2015 to document the evolution of the nearby Mount Holyoke Range until the summer of 3015.

The technology behind Keats' camera is simple—so simple, in fact, that it doesn't involve much technology at all. Any technology we have now, says Keats, is going to be unintelligible 10 years from now, much less 1,000 years from now. In order for the camera to be sustainable over time, he continues, it can't rely on a mechanical shutter, a developing process or an operating system. 

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See the Dramatic Effects of Climate Change in the Alaskan Arctic 100 Years Ago vs. Today

February 11, 2015
By Rachel Rogol

Beneski Museum of Natural History
Top: Okpilak Glacier, 1907. Photo by Ernest Leffingwell.
Bottom: Okpilak Glacier, 2007. Photo by Matt Nolan.

If a picture is worth a thousand words, Then & Now: The Changing Arctic Landscape—a traveling exhibition from the University of Alaska Museum of the North—speaks volumes about glacial retreat and the consequences of climate change in the Alaskan Arctic.

On view at Amherst College’s Beneski Museum of Natural History through April 19, 2015, Then & Now features photographs and media presentations that illustrate the startling effects of climate change, provide context about the Arctic ecosystem and illuminate the behind-the-photo stories of the consequences of climate change for Arctic indigenous peoples.

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Visiting Artist Sheila Pepe Creates Social Sculpture in Eli Marsh Gallery

 

February 17, 2015
By Rachel Rogol

Sheila Pepe installation Sheila Pepe: From Space to Place, Eli Marsh Gallery, 2015.

“Please don't touch the artwork” is not something you’ll hear when visiting the newest installation in Amherst’s Eli Marsh Gallery.

World-renowned contemporary artist Sheila Pepe—best known for her large-scale and site-specific works of knitting and crocheting—has created a remarkable installation that combines her hand-crocheted materials with artworks by Amherst faculty. The result is an intimate setting that welcomes visitors inside… to sit, to contemplate and, most interestingly, to participate.

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Two Exhibitions Mark President Kennedy's Visit to Amherst 50 Years Ago

By Peter Rooney

The photos are atmospheric, historic and dramatic, some in color, some in black and white, capturing the historic day on Oct. 26, 1963, when President John F. Kennedy visited Amherst College to receive an honorary degree and preside over the groundbreaking for the Robert Frost Library.

Picturing Tokyo

By Emily Gold Boutilier

The idea for the Mead’s current special exhibition arose, appropriately, from an undergraduate course. First taught in 2009, “Reinventing Tokyo: The Art, Literature and Politics of Japan’s Modern Capital” was conceived by three professors—Trent Maxey, Samuel Morse and Timothy Van Compernolle—as an interdisciplinary look at how Tokyo has changed over the past century and a half.  

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