Students Encounter Nature around Amherst

Submitted on Wednesday, 10/30/2013, at 9:47 AM

The Most Trusted Canadian

Nature

Submitted by Rachel K. Brickman on Wednesday, 10/12/2011, at 10:43 AM

There is a constant suggested (or sometimes blatantly stated) connection between the Caribbean landscape and the colonized peoples inhabiting it. The European dualism of ‘white=rational; black=emotional’ complements the overwhelmed nature of the senses when in contact with the Caribbean beaches, fauna, and other ‘exotic’ motifs. Both Suzanne and Aime Cesaire discussed their opinions on how the black colonized person should view him or herself in the context of their native land.

Music and the Nature/Culture Paradox

Submitted by Grace F. Donahue on Friday, 1/28/2011, at 2:31 PM

The question of how I situate myself in the beginning of this course could be answered by imagining two very distinct strands of interests in my life that have come full circle around me in the past year. My earliest and clearest memories are of people, music and what could be called “nature”. In effect, from a very young age I have been steeped in the material that gives form to the culture/nature paradox in anthropology. Although I do not currently play any instruments, I have been listening and engaging with music in many ways throughout my whole life.

Stewards or Curators? Caring for Nature

Submitted by Andy Anderson
Dizard, Jan E., Going Wild: Hunting, Animal Rights, and the Contested Meaning of Nature, 1999, Amherst, MA: University of Massachusetts Press, pp. 173-211.

Stewards or Curators? Caring for Nature

Submitted by Andy Anderson
Dizard, Jan E., Going Wild: Hunting, Animal Rights, and the Contested Meaning of Nature, 1999, Amherst, MA: University of Massachusetts Press, pp. 173-211.

Stewards or Curators? Caring for Nature

Submitted by Andy Anderson
Dizard, Jan E., Going Wild: Hunting, Animal Rights, and the Contested Meaning of Nature, 1999, Amherst, MA: University of Massachusetts Press, pp. 173-211.

Nature Episode to Feature Professor Ethan Temeles’ Hummingbird Research

December 22, 2009Ethan Temeles

Tiny birds will be the big stars of an episode of Nature airing Jan. 10 on PBS. The episode will feature the hummingbird research of Ethan J. Temeles, professor of biology at Amherst College.

The show, titled “Hummingbirds: Magic in the Air,” will feature Temeles’ research on the purple-throated carib hummingbird on the island nation of Dominica. The film is spectacular for its high-speed cinematography: viewers can literally see hummingbirds trying to kick each other as they squabble over food and get birds’-eye views of them feeding from flowers.

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