Thinking Compassionate Thoughts

By Peter Rooney

[Faculty] Chances are, the first words that you associate with mindfulness are not physics or economics. So how is it that two Amherst faculty members from those fields are in charge of two organizations devoted to the concepts of mindfulness and contemplative practice?

“Fortunate births, perhaps?” offers Daniel Barbezat, professor of economics and executive director of the Northampton-based Center for Contemplative Mind in Society.

A Meeting of the Mindful to introduce compassion, kindness in schools worldwide

Submitted on Tuesday, 5/28/2013, at 4:46 PM

May 28, 2013 • By Peter Rooney

AMHERST, Mass. – The Amherst College campus is forging ever stronger links with the burgeoning mindfulness movement, in academia and beyond.

The most recent example is an initiative—funded with a $1 million grant from the Dalai Lama and spearheaded by a renowned physicist from Amherst College and a group of 30 leading minds in fields such as education, neuroscience and childhood development—to integrate the core principles of compassion and kindness into a secular ethics curriculum that can be taught worldwide, to people of all ages.

NPR: Zajonc on Einstein's God

In a special edition of Wisconsin Public Radio’s To the Best of Our Knowledge, Professor of Physics Arthur Zajonc helped host Jim Fleming grapple with the question “Can Science Be Sacred?” A long time practitioner of meditation, Zajonc says that Einstein's idea of god is common to many top scientists. Listen here.

My Life: Arthur Zajonc

Psychology Today: Meditation and Art

Physics professor Arthur Zajonc blogged about a program sponsored by the Mead Art Museum that encourages the practice of contemplative engagement with paintings. “Contemplative beholding of art - indeed of anything - can lead to the animation of whatever is before us,” he wrote. “New eyes, ‘the right eyes,’ suddenly open, waking us up, and consequently awakening everything around us.”

To The Best of Our Knowledge: Science and the Search for Meaning: Five Questions: Can Science Be Sacred?

Physics professor Arthur Zajonc spoke at length about God and religion with the syndicated National Public Radio program about science.

Evening Meditation Sessions to Resume at the Mead Art Museum on Nov. 10

October 26, 2010
Contact: Pamela Russell
Coordinator of College Programs
413/542-8229

AMHERST, Mass.—For the second year, the Mead Art Museum at Amherst College will hold a series of evening meditation sessions, free and open to the public, in the museum’s galleries at 7:30 p.m. on the Wednesday evenings of Nov. 10 and Dec. 8, 2010, and Jan. 26, Feb. 16 and March 9, 2011.

Mead Art Museum to Host Evening Meditation Sessions Feb. 17, March 24, April 7 and May 5

January 12, 2010
Contact: Pamela Russell
Coordinator of College Programs
413/542 8229

AMHERST, Mass.—The Mead Art Museum at AmherstCollege will hold a series of four evening meditation sessions, free and open to the public, in the museum’s galleries at 7:30 p.m. on the Wednesday evenings of Feb. 17, March 24, April 7 and May 5.

Always Mindful

Submitted by Katherine D. Duke on Thursday, 8/13/2009, at 1:57 PM

“How come we all can’t be just a little bit more like monks here?”

Andrew Kriete ’11E has been wondering about this ever since he returned to Amherst after four months practicing meditation in a Tibetan Buddhist monastery in New York. He was speaking on a student panel on April 23 as part of the college’s first Day of Mindfulness—a series of events inviting members of the college community to explore various contemplative practices. In the Babbott Room of the Octagon, nine students discussed how and why they’re trying to be mindful in their academic and social lives.

CBC Radio One: How to think about science

Submitted by Caroline J. Hanna
Arthur Zajonc, Andrew W. Mellon Professor of Physics and chair of the physics department at Amherst, was featured in an extensive interview on the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's "Ideas" program.

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