Professor Writes Book on Yoruba Art

Submitted on Thursday, 7/2/2015, at 11:47 AM

Yoruba Art and Language (cover detail)In his 2014 book, Yoruba Art and Language: Seeking the African in African Art, Amherst Professor Rowland Abiodun uses the metaphor of a point-and-shoot camera to describe why western art history principles are not applicable to the study of African art.

Behold!

In one art history seminar, each student spends four months on a single work of art.

By Emily Gold Boutilier

[Courses] How long do your eyes linger on an object in an art museum? Thirty seconds? Two minutes? Ten minutes? Imagine studying a single painting for an entire semester. It’s not a luxury; it’s an Amherst course.

In Professor Joel Upton’s seminar “The Art of Beholding,” each student picks one painting to focus on for four months.

Visiting Artist Sheila Pepe Creates Social Sculpture in Eli Marsh Gallery

 

February 17, 2015
By Rachel Rogol

Sheila Pepe installationSheila Pepe: From Space to Place, Eli Marsh Gallery, 2015.

“Please don't touch the artwork” is not something you’ll hear when visiting the newest installation in Amherst’s Eli Marsh Gallery.

World-renowned contemporary artist Sheila Pepe—best known for her large-scale and site-specific works of knitting and crocheting—has created a remarkable installation that combines her hand-crocheted materials with artworks by Amherst faculty. The result is an intimate setting that welcomes visitors inside… to sit, to contemplate and, most interestingly, to participate.

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Students Encounter Nature around Amherst

Submitted on Wednesday, 10/30/2013, at 9:47 AM

Permanent Adoptions

By Emily Gold Boutilier

When the Mead Art Museum chooses to acquire a new work of art, it takes the long view. “We look at a 500-year window,” says Director Elizabeth E. Barker. “We’ll have it forever. It’s like a permanent adoption.”

Given the serious commitment involved, curators at the Mead take no acquisition lightly. They consider quality, condition and importance, as well as how a particular work relates to the other items in the museum, Barker says.

Let’s Hear It for Soundfest

Submitted on Sunday, 3/3/2013, at 12:25 PM

Article by Katherine Duke '05

Photos by Cole Morgan '13 and Rob Mattson

The sunny afternoon of Sat., March 30, certainly looked and felt like spring—and sounded like it, too. But I was on campus to immerse myself in the more unusual auditory stimuli of Soundfest, a featured event of the 2012–13 Copeland Colloquium: “Art in Place / the Place of Art.”

Evaluation - Art at the Heart of the College

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Research Fellowships for Creative Artists

So Many Bones!!

I have a confession to make:

I, Kayla White, have not explored all of the nifty places on campus that I rave about during my tours.  Well, a couple of corrections: I had not, and I'd been to them all, I just hadn’t explored all the nooks and crannies.  But, friends, I am proud to say that I have and they are WAY cooler than I ever thought (I already knew, if only through the grapevine, that they were pretty neat spaces). 

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