Let’s Hear It for Soundfest

Submitted on Sunday, 3/3/2013, at 12:25 PM

Article by Katherine Duke '05

Photos by Cole Morgan '13 and Rob Mattson

The sunny afternoon of Sat., March 30, certainly looked and felt like spring—and sounded like it, too. But I was on campus to immerse myself in the more unusual auditory stimuli of Soundfest, a featured event of the 2012–13 Copeland Colloquium: “Art in Place / the Place of Art.”

Evaluation - Art at the Heart of the College

We’re so glad you could join us for Amherst Today: Art at the Heart of the College. We hope to offer many more such programs, and we would appreciate your help in making them as good as they can be. Please take a few minutes to fill out the survey below. Specific comments would be very much appreciated.

Please rate each of the following from 1 to 5, with 1 being excellent and 5 being poor.

Communication before the program: *
The chosen topic - Art at the Heart of the College: *
The required readings: *
The suggested readings: *
Open classes on Thursday: *
Keynote address: Library, Laboratory, Sanctuary, Stage: New Roles for the 21st Century College Art Museum: *
The Mead in Action Across the Curriculum: Notes and Anecdotes from the Study Room: *
Open Conversation with the Mead's Curatorial Team: *
Reception at the Mead Art Museum Friday evening: *
Dinner in Lewis Sebring Thursday evening: *
I Love the Mead student comments: *
Art After Dark: *
All Things Old are New Again: Presentations by Faculty: *
Faculty members, in order of comments, were Tekla Harms, professor of geology and director of the Beneski Museum of Natural History; Kim Townsend, Class of 1959 professor of English, emeritus; Victoria Maillo, lecturer of Spanish; and Robert T. Hayashi, professor of English and American Studies.
Reinventing Tokyo: Japan's Largest City in the Artistic Imagination: *
Break out session with Lizzie Barker, director of the Mead Art Museum: *
Break out session with Pamela Russell, head of education and Andrew W. Mellon curator of academic programs: *
Break out session with Randall Griffey, head of curatorial affairs and curator of American art: *
Break out session with Bettina Jungen, Thomas P. Whitney '37 curator of Russian art: *
Meals at Valentine (Thursday lunch, Friday breakfast and/or Friday lunch): *
Enter the characters shown in the image or use the speaker icon to get an audio version.

Research Fellowships for Creative Artists

So Many Bones!!

I have a confession to make:

I, Kayla White, have not explored all of the nifty places on campus that I rave about during my tours.  Well, a couple of corrections: I had not, and I'd been to them all, I just hadn’t explored all the nooks and crannies.  But, friends, I am proud to say that I have and they are WAY cooler than I ever thought (I already knew, if only through the grapevine, that they were pretty neat spaces). 

Sound, Silence, and Process at Amherst College

by Taylor Haney for PVS Trial Media Project, Spring 2012

Resident Artist David Gloman Featured on Heisman Telecast

Submitted on Friday, 12/2/2011, at 2:00 PM

By Rob Mattson

Football and painting seem to have as much in common as Nietzsche and NASCAR, but David Gloman can attest otherwise. The 19-year veteran of Amherst College, a resident artist in the Department of Art and the History of Art, was hired to create drawings of 30 of today’s best football players as part of the ESPN production of the 77th Heisman Memorial Trophy Presentation. On Dec. 10, Baylor University player Robert Griffin III became the 32nd quarterback to earn college football’s most coveted trophy, but the opportunity to be part of such an iconic event was a victory for Gloman as well, like a swollen river that finally crested, but only after years of ebbing, flowing, meandering and shaping the landscape of his life.

“A Bouquet of Flowers of Evil”

Oct. 29, 2010

Interview by Katherine Duke ’05

Just in time for Halloween, I sat down with Natasha Staller, a professor of the history of art who is currently at work on a book called The Spanish Monster, to talk about her popular course “Witches, Vampires and Other Monsters.” Read on to find out how monsters—in different forms throughout history—have crept into disciplines ranging from art to women’s studies to medical science to political science, and why Staller finds Sharon Stone more terrifying than Nosferatu.