Problematic Species and the Quabbin Reservoir: Balancing Ecological Diversity, Recreation, and Water Quality

Quabbin Reservoir Dates: January 3 – 21, 2011
Days: Weekdays
Time: 9:00 AM – 4:00 PM
Access: All Five College students, no charge
Credit: None (co-curricular)

Problematic Species and the Quabbin Reservoir: Balancing Ecological Diversity, Recreation, and Water Quality

Dates: January 4 – 22, 2010
Days: Weekdays
Time: 9:00am – 4:00pm

Location:Meeting in Webster 102 and the lower floors of Seeley Mudd; faculty presentations and technology trainings in various classrooms; on-site visits to the Quabbin Reservoir and the Harvard Forest.

The Hemlock Woolly Adelgid is an aphid-like invasive pest native to eastern  Asia that attacks hemlock trees by attaching to needles and sucking the sap of the tree. It can be identified by its  white woolly egg sack covering  present on the underside of branches. Trees infested with adelgids typically lose all their needles and die within 4 years of the first infestation.

Hemlock Woolly Adelgid on DWSP Lands

Submitted by Andy Anderson
Hemlock Woolly Adelgid (Adelges tsugae Annand) on DWSP Lands: Problem extent and proposed management approach

Hemlock Woolly Adelgid on Hemlock Branch

Submitted by Andy Anderson
From the U.S. Forest Service.

The Hemlock Woolly Adelgid

Submitted by Andy Anderson

Short articles describing some of the problems associated with the hemlock woolly adelgid:

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