Examining Succession

New England forests generally follow a specific pattern of regrowth, with successive groups of plants dominating the landscape.  Scrub brush is the first to grow back after an interruption, including berry plants.  That is followed by birches and poplars, which are replaced by pines and oaks, until finally a climax forest of hardwoods, especially maples and beeches.  To identify an area in the midst of this process, we used ArcMap to highlight stands of birch and poplar.  We then created a layer to overlay onto Google Earth, which helped us find the most accessible location.

Quabbin Forest

Quabbin Forest Types

MWRA WATER SYSTEM MAP -04

The Massachusetts Water Resources Authority map of their water system, including the Quabbin Reservoir on the western end.

Moose in the Quabbin

Submitted by Andy Anderson
Photo of moose in the Quabbin. From

Quabbin Reservoir

Submitted by Andy Anderson

Short articles about the Quabbin Reservoir, describing its character, history, and management:

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Quabbin Landscape and DCR/OWM Natural Resources Management

Submitted by Andy Anderson
A set of "Fast Facts" about the Quabbin Reservoir, specifically its character and management.

The Accidental Wilderness

Submitted by Andy Anderson
Conuel, Thomas, Quabbin: The Accidental Wilderness, 1990, Amherst, MA: The University of Massachusetts Press, pp. 17-30.

Stewards or Curators? Caring for Nature

Submitted by Andy Anderson
Dizard, Jan E., Going Wild: Hunting, Animal Rights, and the Contested Meaning of Nature, 1999, Amherst, MA: University of Massachusetts Press, pp. 173-211.

Moose in the Quabbin

Submitted by Andy Anderson
Photo of moose in the Quabbin. From

Quabbin Landscape and DCR/OWM Natural Resources Management

Submitted by Andy Anderson
A set of "Fast Facts" about the Quabbin Reservoir, specifically its character and management.

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