In Conversation with Jay Rubin

Submitted by Ryan P. Mihaly on Saturday, 10/11/2014, at 4:36 PM

My conversation with Jay Rubin, one of Haruki Murakami's English translators, appeared on Asymptote journal's blog on October 9th. See an excerpt below, and read the full article here.

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Professor Barry O’Connell on Remembering, Discussing, Teaching and (Not) Understanding 9/11

Kind of a Love Story

Professor Lawrence Douglas Publishes Two New Works of Fiction

Submitted on Wednesday, 8/17/2011, at 4:25 PM

Interview by Katherine Duke '05

In Chapter Five of The Girl with the Sturgeon TattooSwedish author Lars Arffssen’s new thriller about an investigation into serial reindeer killings and the secret history of the UKEA furniture company—protagonist Mikael Blomberg sneaks into the vast but messy apartment of the brilliant young hacker Lizzy Salamander and finds, on her nightstand, a copy of the novel The Vices, by Lawrence Douglas. “Must order it on Amazon,” he thinks.

Such conspicuous product placement is a treat for readers who are in on the joke: that Arffssen and Douglas are one and the same. Aug. 30 will mark the release of Sturgeon Tattoo, a parody of The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo and the other novels in Stieg Larsson’s bestselling crime thriller trilogy. The Vices, released on Aug. 16, is—like Douglas’s first novel, The Catastrophist—set partly at a fictional (but familiar) liberal arts college in Massachusetts.

A Conversation with the 19th President

Interview by Emily Gold Boutilier

Lisa Raskin, John William Ward Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience

“A Bouquet of Flowers of Evil”

Oct. 29, 2010

Interview by Katherine Duke ’05

Just in time for Halloween, I sat down with Natasha Staller, a professor of the history of art who is currently at work on a book called The Spanish Monster, to talk about her popular course “Witches, Vampires and Other Monsters.” Read on to find out how monsters—in different forms throughout history—have crept into disciplines ranging from art to women’s studies to medical science to political science, and why Staller finds Sharon Stone more terrifying than Nosferatu.

On Their Honor

Ben Lieber, Dean of Academic Support and Student Research

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