5 Free Things to Do on Campus This Summer

By Elaine Jeon ’17

The newest season of Game of Thrones has ended, and you’ve already binge-watched all of Orange is the New Black. And you can’t keep frequenting restaurants in town or your credit card will surely explode. Whether you’re a student, professor, staff member, alum or visitor, here are five free things to do on the Amherst College campus to keep you busy and financially solvent this summer.

 

The Poet and the Puppeteer

Submitted on Thursday, 8/22/2013, at 10:55 AM

Article by Katherine Duke ’05

Photos by Michael Bauman

On a warm July evening, on the grassy lawn of the Wilder Observatory, six actors and a musician from the Mettawee River Theatre Company gathered in front of an audience of all ages and used puppets and poetry to bring a medieval Welsh tale to life. Taliesin—which blends mythology and real historical figures—tells of a boy magically reborn as a sorcerer-poet and adopted by a fisherman and his wife, who uses his extraordinary gifts to shake things up in the king’s court. The performance was the result of a joint effort between two theater professionals who first collaborated at Amherst College more than 55 years ago.

Amherst College’s Wilder Observatory and Bassett Planetarium to Unveil Two Mural-Sized Images of the Spiral Galaxy Messier 101 Feb. 15

February 5, 2009     
Contact: Steve Sauter
Director of the Bassett Planetarium
413/542-5054


AMHERST, Mass.—Witness a special event on Sunday, Feb. 15, at 2 p.m. at Amherst College’s Wilder Observatory on Snell Street in Amherst when two new mural-sized images taken by NASA’s Great Observatories—the Hubble Space Telescope, Spitzer Space Telescope and Chandra X-ray Observatory—will be unveiled to the public.

Wilder Observatory

Wilder Observatory, built in 1903, holds what was once one of the largest telescopes in the world. With an 18-inch front element, it remains one of the largest refracting telescopes in existence. Museum Education Coordinator and Director of the Bassett Planetarium Steve Sauter welcomes us to the little-known building on Snell Street.