Amherst College Study Finds That Getting in Sync Hones Individual Abilities and Cooperation

April 14, 2010                       

AMHERST, Mass.—Groups who move together in time during an exercise (such as soldiers marching, sports teams warming up for a game or warriors performing a ritualistic dance prior to a hunt) don’t just strengthen their relationships with one another—they actually sharpen their individual skills and perform better as a unit as a result, according to new research conducted by Amherst College psychology professor Piercarlo Valdesolo; his student, Amherst senior Jennifer Ouyang; and Northeastern University psychology professor David DeSteno.

The Blame Game

By Katherine Duke '05

A certain current Amherst student—let’s give her the pseudonym “Cassie”—and her friend made a decoration for Family Weekend this year: a pumpkin with an A carved in it. “We put a strobe light in it,” Cassie says. “I was so proud of it. All my friends said it was the coolest thing they’d ever seen.”

Why we're all moral hypocrites

Piercarlo Valdesolo, Robert E. Keiter 1957 Postdoctoral Fellow in Psychology, again commented on his research in this MSN article.

Deep Down, We Can't Even Fool Ourselves

Piercarlo Valdesolo, Robert E. Keiter 1957 Postdoctoral Fellow in Psychology, discussed his studies of moral hypocrisy and self-leniency in this story in The New York Times.