With Chávez Absent, Venezuela Now Governed by Two Leaders, Says Amherst Poli Sci Prof

Submitted on Wednesday, 1/23/2013, at 8:48 AM

January 22, 2013

Presidential Inauguration Day: For citizens of the U.S. and most other democracies, the event signifies either a peaceful transfer of power to another administration or the opportunity for a re-elected president to make cabinet changes. But in Venezuela, this year’s presidential inauguration day, Jan. 10, was mired in controversy.

On Venezuela's Crisis 2013-2014

Watch the video: “Democracy Ideas:   Authoritarianism in Venezuela.”  Recorded interview by Christopher Walker, National Endowment for Democracy, February 24, 2014.

Dow Jones: Venezuela's Economy Struggled In 2010 But Its Bonds Thrived

Poli sci professor Javier Corrales commented on the state of Venezuela’s economy in this piece that ran in the Wall Street Journal, among other outlets. “As the government’s popularity declines, quite significantly, its institutional control has risen,” he said. “In terms of a functioning economic market, this is a market in decline. It’s remarkable how much capital flight there has been. And it’s because of the arbitrary policies of the government.”

Los Angeles Times: Venezuela awaits results of National Assembly elections

“The government is facing the highest degree of unpopularity since 2003,” said political science professor Javier Corrales about this fall’s Venezuelan elections in a lengthy piece. “But at the same time, it has acquired more mechanisms to protect its stranglehold on power. The government always finds a way to contain it, and this election is no exception.”

Huffington Post: Chaos in Caracas

“This could very well be a turning point in the direction of authoritarianism,” political science professor Javier Corrales was quoted as saying in this column about recent attempts by Venezuelan President Hugo Chávez to squelch opposition in the country. “At this point, Venezuela could become much more militarized and its political system more autocratic.”

Javier Corrales on Venezuela/Latin America Developments

Political science professor Javier Corrales served as an expert source for stories in Bloomberg News, The Los Angeles Times and Foreign Policy about Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez, politics in Venezuela and gays in Latin America.

My Life: Javier Corrales, Associate Professor of Political Science

Amherst College Political Science Professor Javier Corrales Advises Congress on Venezuela Policy

October 24, 2008               

AMHERST, Mass.—It is critical that the United States develop a counter-strategy to the “social power” diplomacy deployed by Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez and his government, but a hard-line response—such as military or economic aggression—is most certainly not the answer to Chavez’s rhetoric, Amherst College’s Javier Corrales, professor of political science, told a House Committee on Foreign Affairs subcommittee recently.