Ready for the Year 3015? World’s Slowest Photograph Will Chart a Millennium’s Evolution

Jonathon Keats
Jonathon Keats '94

The Mead Art Museum is already planning an exhibition in the year 3015 that will unveil the world's slowest photograph, taken in a single exposure over the course of 1,000 years. 

The conceptual artist behind the project is Jonathon Keats '94, whose "millennium camera" will be installed atop Amherst's Stearns Steeple in June 2015 to document the evolution of the nearby Mount Holyoke Range until the summer of 3015.

The technology behind Keats' camera is simple—so simple, in fact, that it doesn't involve much technology at all. Any technology we have now, says Keats, is going to be unintelligible 10 years from now, much less 1,000 years from now. In order for the camera to be sustainable over time, he continues, it can't rely on a mechanical shutter, a developing process or an operating system. 

March 30 — SOUNDFEST

They say that March is "in like a lion, out like a lamb". This year's Copeland Colloquium will bid farewell to this month of transition with a program of indoor and outdoor sound installation and performance, as lively and fierce and dynamic as a lion's roar (while we hope for lamb-like weather). We will feature work by Tim Eriksen, Wendy Woodson, Jake Meginsky, Eric Leonardson, Steph Robinson & Mark Santolucito. The event is free and open to the public.

No Shower in This Tower

Winner of Mead Art Museum Contest Installs Artwork in Stearns Steeple

Jutting up into the sky in front of the Mead Art Museum, Stearns Steeple has long been one of the most impressive and distinctive features of the Amherst campus. We’ve all seen its stone exterior and heard its bells, but would you care to guess what else is now inside of it?

Henry Oscar Bedford Left and Leaving Video Installation Showing in Amherst College’s Stearns Steeple

May 27, 2010

AMHERST, Mass.—Henry Oscar Bedford ’11, in conjunction with the Mead Art Museum at Amherst College, is showing the video installation Left and Leaving in the Stearns Steeple on the school’s campus.

The First War Memorial

By Emily Gold Boutilier

Stearns Steeple

Built in 1870 out of local stone and a college president's son's hope for "a proper church," Stearns Steeple and its nine bells are all that remain of of the College Church. Dismantled in 1949, the church left its most striking feature quietly embedded between James and Stearns Halls. The New York Times wrote, though, that "at intervals no one seems to be able to predict, chimes still resound from the steeple in memory of the college's Civil War dead." Samuel Masinter '04 joins Aaron Hayden for a climb into the belfry to find out why the steeple still stands.